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Author: 
Anne Hunter
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe delicate blooms of the common snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis, are a sure sign that spring is near! Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photos by Melissa MansurThis GIF shows the High Line at West 20th Street at three points during the spring season: before Spring Cutback, after Spring Cutback, and later in spring as new growth takes over the planting beds. Photos by Melissa Mansur
 

After the winter that we’ve had, tomorrow’s 50° F (or 10° C) will feel almost balmy. Regardless of the temperature, the spirit of spring has already begun to infuse the city and our staff with fond thoughts of the season ahead. Behind the scenes here, High Line Gardeners are prepping their buckets, shears, and wheelbarrows for the beginning of our largest horticultural task of the year, Spring Cutback, which kicks off next week.

Author: 
Thomas Smarr
Photo by Mike TschappatCutting back dried stems and leaves allows fresh growth to flourish in your garden. Photo by Mike Tschappat
 

We celebrate our gardens year-round at the High Line, paying special attention to the beauty of untouched perennials in the autumn and winter, and preparing for the burst of growth in the spring and array of colors throughout the summer. Here are some ways we prepare the gardens in spring.

Author: 
Anne Hunter
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe young bur oaks, Quercus macrocarpa, growing on the High Line have distinctive corky ridges along their limbs. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

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