The High Line Blog

  • Plant of the Week: Heartleaf foamflower

    Spring is here on the High Line! Tucked into the shadier areas of the High Line you will notice clumps of these magical looking flowers meandering their way through the garden beds. Native to the Eastern regions of North America, from as far north as Canada to as far south as Georgia, Tiarella... read more
  • Green Council Welcomes Spring on the High Line

    The 2017 Green Council cohort participates in their first Cutback day on the park.Spring has finally arrived on the High Line! Led by High Line Educators, Green Council is a paid education and job-training program that offers local teens hands-on experience in horticulture, community gardening, a... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Grape Hyacinth

    It's been a long, cold, lonely winter on the High Line that at times seemed never ending. The cold weather continued through most of our spring cutback, including a winter storm that covered all of our plants in six inches of solid ice. But the ice slowly melted, and after we managed to dig th... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Eastern skunk cabbage

    Tucked into a boggy, wetland bed of the towering graceful cattail ( Typha laxmanii) and winter scouring rush (Equisetum hyemale), a curious new addition has been added to the High Line's diverse plant collection. Eastern skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus, is native to Eastern North Americ... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Upright European hornbeam

    As early spring bloomers are popping up, it's easy to overlook the Carpinus betulus. Native to Europe and Asia, the Carpinus betulus is a medium sized hardwood tree than can often be seen around the city being used in a wide range of situations. A slow growing tree, the Carpinus features a com... read more
  • Composting on the High Line at 30'

    We are pleased to share this guest blog post by Annik LaFarge, author of On the High Line: Exploring America's Most Original Urban Park, which originally appeared on Livinthehighline.com. Five years ago I tagged along with a High Line gardener on what was then a weekly trip to Staten Island, wher... read more
  • Gardening in the Sky: Cutting Back on Winter

    We normally think of cutting back last season's perennial growth as a preparation for spring, but this year spring began before we even started our annual Spring Cutback. In New York City, plants were about twenty-five days ahead of their normal schedule and many scientists believe spring's ea... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Christmas fern

    Polystichum acrostichoides provides green ground cover through winter. The evergreen plant is adaptable and hardy. Its common name, "Christmas fern," denotes its year-round greenery. It is easy to grow and requires little care. P. acrostichoides grows best in full to part shade and prefers wel... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Graceful cattail

    One of my favorite memories of Spring Cutback on the High Line occurred two seasons ago. Our team was working in the bog with our annual group of Google volunteers. As we cut back the area, the densely packed seed heads of the cattails exploded everywhere, mimicking snowfall on that sunny Marc... read more
  • Spring Cutback Volunteer Spotlight: Alfredo Taylor-White

    Our annual Spring Cutback wouldn't be possible without the hard work and dedication of our horticulture volunteers and gardeners, who help trim back more than 110,000 plants along our 1.5-mile-long park. Meet High Line volunteer Alfredo Taylor-White, who is participating in Spring Cutback for ... read more