The High Line Blog

  • Plant of the Week: Sea Lavender

    Limonium platyphyllum, or sea lavender, is a clump-forming perennial native to southeastern and central Europe. It blooms July through August and reveals hundreds of tiny, lavender-blue flowers at the ends of thin, wire-like stems. Despite its common name, it is not related to lavenders at all... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Virginia marsh-St. John's-wort

    Triadenum virginicum, also referred to as Hypericum virginicum and by its common name Virginia marsh-St. John's-wort is a perennial plant. This marsh herb belongs to the Clusiaceae family. Marsh St. John's wort is most prevalent in New England. However, its native range extends down the easter... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Star of Persia

    Did the presence of a cluster of purple stars bewitch you along your High Line commute? Allium cristophii, also known as the star of Persia, shows bright vibrant shades of purple from late spring to early summer. Although Allium cristophii attracts most of its attention while in bloom, it i... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Yellow pitcher plant

    Sarracenia flava, also known as yellow pitcher plant, is a perennial native to southeastern United States. In the wild, its range stretches from Virginia to Florida, sweeping west to Mobile Bay, Alabama. It can grow from one and a half feet to three feet tall and can spread from one and a half... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Sweetclover

    Sweetclover, Melilotus officinalis, can be found growing on the Interim Walkway by the Western Rail Yards. It is an annual, sometimes biennial, ranging in height between two feet in poor, dry soils to eight feet tall in richer, moist soils. The leaves are in alternate arrangement on the st... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Northern maidenhair fern

    Adiantum pedatum, also called northern maidenhair fern, is one of my favorite plants that you can find here on the High Line. It is a deciduous perennial plant, and like many ferns, it is in the Pteridaceae family. This fern can grow to 2.5 feet tall and 1.5 feet wide. In the wild, they are na... read more
  • Celebrating Spring Ephemerals

    DISCOVER SPRING EPHEMERALS ON THE HIGH LINE For the 2018 season, the High Line is celebrating the floral character of spring. Below, we'll share insights into the curious characteristics of spring ephemerals. We also invite you to truly discover the flowers of spring through tours and activi... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Twinleaf

    Jeffersonia diphylla, also called twinleaf, can be found at the Gansevoort Woodlands and Tiffany & Company Foundation Overlook. Jeffersonia was named by the botanist Benjamin Smith Barton to honor the third President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, and it is in the Berberidaceae fa... read more
  • FEED: A garden soundscape

    Experience the High Line gardens in a way you never have before. Brooklyn-based poet Tommy Pico, originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, walks you through the park, sharing whispered stories, memories, and secrets of what the gardens' microclimates evoke for him. H... read more
  • Gardening in the Sky: Survival of the... Fairest?

    Spring ephemerals are plants that emerge, bloom, produce seed, and disappear all within a matter of weeks. These plants employ fascinating survival strategies to get a jump-start on other species or to overcome tough conditions. Like other so-called "charismatic" species, many spring ephemeral... read more