High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hummingbird moth. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA snowberry clearwing moth, commonly known as a hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a prairie sage bloom on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s gardens aren’t just visited and appreciated by people, there are also a host of six- and eight-legged bugs who drop by. You’ll find the beloved honeybee, innocuous milkweed bugs and corn spiders, lesser-liked oriental beetles, a variety of beautiful butterflies, and even beneficial bugs like ladybug and lacewings that our gardeners purposefully release in order to combat pests. One of the rarer sights, a hummingbird moth, Hemaris diffinis, was captured earlier this month by High Line Photographer – and documenter of all things winged – Steven Severinghaus.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Sideoats grama in midsummer. Photo by Friends of the High LineBouteloua curtipendula, or sideoats grama, is distinguished by tall stems lined with drooping awns that arch gracefully over the rest of its foliage. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line at night. Photo by Timothy SchenckA view looking out across the High Line, 10th Avenue, and the New York City skyline. Photo by Timothy Schenck

New York City is a city at its most enchanting after dark. The glow of neon signs, the patchwork of lit windows in tall buildings, and the jagged twinkling skyline of buildings in the distance bring new life to familiar forms. And, if it’s not obvious, we love, love, love night on the High Line.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Johnny Linville. Photo by Friends of the High LinePhoto by Friends of the High Line

“Sometimes you forget you’re 30 feet in the air. It’s kind of magical.” This is how Johnny Linville spoke of how he experienced the High Line when he began working here as a gardener in 2009. Five years later, Johnny’s sense of magic in the park was as strong as ever. It is with a heavy sense of loss that we announce his passing on August 1, 2014.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Veronicastrum virginicum. Photo by Friends of the High LineVeronicastrum virginicum, or Culver’s root. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erycka Montoya Pérez
Fulton Houses garden. Photo by Liz LigonLocal gardener Tari Stubblefield surveys the restored community garden. Photo by Liz Ligon

This past April, High Line horticultural staff, volunteers, and teens in our Green Corps program helped local gardener Tari Stubblefield restore a garden at the Fulton Houses in Chelsea. The initiative, called Neighbor Day, was a partnership between Friends of the High Line, Fulton Houses Tenant Association President Miguel Acevedo, and the NYCHA Gardening & Sustainability Unit.

See more photos below.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line's Northern Spur Preserve in different seasons. Photo by Steven SeveringhausSeasonal flora on the Northern Spur Preserve. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

We are so often delighted by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus 's ability to capture the changing seasons in the park’s gardens. There’s no better vantage point from which to observe the transitions of the foliage and blooms than from the perch above the Northern Spur Preserve, a sentiment Steven no doubt shares. This quadriptych that Steven created shows the Northern Spur Preserve, located on the High Line at West 16th Street, through a reverse of seasons – winter through summer.

See more photosof the park at its peak in the summer season.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Josh Kline's Skittles part of the High Line Art group exhibition, Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Josh Kline’s Skittles, part of the group exhibition Archeo, is an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients, including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray. Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by @aloarowa

There are very few (good) reasons to awake at 5:30 AM, but the promise of a picturesque sunrise and room to roam brought out a snap-happy group of Instagrammers to the park on Wednesday, July 23. We joined with Instagram to welcome a small group to visit the park before it opened and document their adventures. The event, #emptyhighline, produced dozens of beautiful shots that captured the park in an early morning glow.

Check out some of our favorites below, and follow @highlinenyc and @highlineartnyc for more beautiful photos of the park.

Author: 
Marek Pundzak
Shenandoah red switch grass in the summer. Photo by Friends of the High LineShenandoah red switch grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’) is accented by airy reddish-pink panicles in the summer. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

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