High Line Blog

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Author: 
Rebecca Hughes
Visitors enjoy Brooklyn Soda Works on the High Line at 14th Street. Photo by Rowa LeeVisitors enjoy drinks from Brooklyn Soda Works. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

How many soda manufacturers begin production with a trip to the farmer’s market? Brooklyn Soda Works may be the first. The company’s creative process is almost as refreshing as their drinks – unlike traditional sodas on the market that combine artificial syrups with carbonated water, Brooklyn Soda Works carbonates their own cold-pressed fresh fruit juices and adds steeped herbs and spices.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Liz Ligon Participants take their spot on the line. Photo by Liz Ligon

How long is a minute?

This was the question posed by artist David Lamelas during his performance Time Line on the High Line. The interactive piece took place in three different locations throughout the park on July 22, 23, and 24. Park visitors were invited to stand along a white strip of tape and "pass along" the time. The performance began with an announcement of the time to the first participant in line. That person “held” the time for an estimated one minute, at which point they then announced the time out loud and “passed” it to the next person. Visitors were encouraged to join the line at any point and to use their native language to announce the time, thereby adding their own subjective sense of time to the performance’s duration.

So, how long is a minute? Sixty seconds.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Autumn moor grass. Photo by Friends of the High LineAutumn moor grass (Sesleria autumnalis) forms upright clumps that lend an almost formal element to the High Line’s naturalistic aesthetic. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Christian Barclay

On July 16 and 17, High Line Art presented Misty Malarky Ying Yang, a new performance by artist Ryan McNamara that celebrated the 35th anniversary of President Jimmy Carter’s famous 1979 “Malaise Speech.”

The nationally televised speech focused on the ongoing energy crisis. Carter pronounced that the American standard of fossil-fuel gluttony would have to end, and the solution would be self-sacrifice as much as policy. His candor went over well for a few days, until the American public realized that the President was pointing the finger squarely at them. It is known as the final nail in the Carter administration’s coffin. For the High Line Performance, McNamara and a group of dancers used the infamous speech as the point of departure for a choreographed spectacle.

The piece began each night at 7:30 PM, at the south end of the park at Gansevoort Street. An enclosed case held the performance materials – a collection of unforgiving lilac printed unitards. The four dancers posed, vogued, and skipped their way through the park in a succession of choreographed sequences, all the while reciting the infamous speech word for word. As the group made their way through the park, the crowd swelled with curious passersby, including a few bemused teens from a nearby High Line Teens dance party.

At risk of turning this into a “you had to be there” post, we’ve chosen a few of our favorite Instagram photos from each night of the performance. Hopefully they convey the energy and dynamism of this singularly kooky piece.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hummingbird moth. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA snowberry clearwing moth, commonly known as a hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a prairie sage bloom on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s gardens aren’t just visited and appreciated by people, there are also a host of six- and eight-legged bugs who drop by. You’ll find the beloved honeybee, innocuous milkweed bugs and corn spiders, lesser-liked oriental beetles, a variety of beautiful butterflies, and even beneficial bugs like ladybug and lacewings that our gardeners purposefully release in order to combat pests. One of the rarer sights, a hummingbird moth, Hemaris diffinis, was captured earlier this month by High Line Photographer – and documenter of all things winged – Steven Severinghaus.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Sideoats grama in midsummer. Photo by Friends of the High LineBouteloua curtipendula, or sideoats grama, is distinguished by tall stems lined with drooping awns that arch gracefully over the rest of its foliage. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line at night. Photo by Timothy SchenckA view looking out across the High Line, 10th Avenue, and the New York City skyline. Photo by Timothy Schenck

New York City is a city at its most enchanting after dark. The glow of neon signs, the patchwork of lit windows in tall buildings, and the jagged twinkling skyline of buildings in the distance bring new life to familiar forms. And, if it’s not obvious, we love, love, love night on the High Line.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Johnny Linville. Photo by Friends of the High LinePhoto by Friends of the High Line

“Sometimes you forget you’re 30 feet in the air. It’s kind of magical.” This is how Johnny Linville spoke of how he experienced the High Line when he began working here as a gardener in 2009. Five years later, Johnny’s sense of magic in the park was as strong as ever. It is with a heavy sense of loss that we announce his passing on August 1, 2014.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Veronicastrum virginicum. Photo by Friends of the High LineVeronicastrum virginicum, or Culver’s root. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erycka Montoya Pérez
Fulton Houses garden. Photo by Liz LigonLocal gardener Tari Stubblefield surveys the restored community garden. Photo by Liz Ligon

This past April, High Line horticultural staff, volunteers, and teens in our Green Corps program helped local gardener Tari Stubblefield restore a garden at the Fulton Houses in Chelsea. The initiative, called Neighbor Day, was a partnership between Friends of the High Line, Fulton Houses Tenant Association President Miguel Acevedo, and the NYCHA Gardening & Sustainability Unit.

See more photos below.

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