High Line Blog

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Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Liz LigonChief Operating Officer Jerome Barth joined Friends of the High Line in July. Photo by Liz Ligon

Friends of the High Line works with the City to make sure the High Line is maintained as a great public place for all visitors to enjoy. The newest addition to our leadership team, Chief Operating Officer Jerome Barth, is tasked with managing the many moving pieces of this multifaceted organization.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Steven SeveringhausIn the Washington Grasslands – as in other parts of the park – the bright colors of summer flowers are fading and the golden autumn tones of grasses are beginning to take over the landscape. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The breeze has taken on a crisp edge, the earthy green scent of prairie dropseed is floating across the park, and some of the summer's favorite flowers are fading. Autumn is on its way.

Before you lament the passing of summer, remember that there's so much to look forward to with fall. There's the gorgeous autumnal foliage, hot drinks from Blue Bottle, and a host of fall blooms, like my favorite, asters.

See more of September's blooms on our monthly bloom list. And don't forget to join us next weekend, on Sunday, September 21, when the third and northernmost section of the park, theHigh Line at the Rail Yards opens to the public.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Chelone glabra, known as white turtlehead, blooms on the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High LineAmong the tough plants of the High Line's bog, Chelone glabra – known as white turtlehead – holds its own. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A busy day in the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie CrimminsA busy day in the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

This summer has seemed to fly by! If you’re anything like us, you’re thrilled to soak up every last drop of sunshine this September, as thoughts turn to cooler fall temperatures.

The 10th Avenue Square, captured here by High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins, is one of park visitors’ favorite gathering spaces. Whether enjoying a bite to eat from one of the High Line’s food vendors – tacos and ice pops, need we say more? – or taking respite after a long walk, it’s the perfect place to relax, unwind, and enjoy the High Line’s unique vantage point on New York City.

Once you’ve come out of hiding after this weekend’s projected rain storms, enjoy some sunshine at your favorite NYC summer locale with friends or family.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Timothy SchenckA view of the Interim Walkway, at the park's northernmost point. Photo by Timothy Schenck

After years of advocacy work, design, and construction, the park's northernmost section – the High Line at the Rail Yards – is finally opening on Sunday, September 21. In celebration, we're hosting a week of special programs for visitors of all ages. You're invited to participate in a morning wellness class, stop by for a lunchtime concert, let the kids play with cool new design features, and so much more.

In addition to special, Opening Week–only events, we've included regular events that occur during this time frame. The description will indicate whether the program is ongoing.

Author: 
Joshua David
A view along the Interim Walkway, a section of the High Line at the Rail Yards that features the self-seeded landscape that grew up after the trains stopped running 25 years ago. Photo by Kathleen FitzgeraldA view along the Interim Walkway, a section of the High Line at the Rail Yards that features the self-seeded landscape that grew up after the trains stopped running 25 years ago. Photo by Kathleen Fitzgerald | OCD
 

Dear Friends,

Thanks to you, we did it!

Today, Friends of the High Line, along with our partners at the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, is proud to announce that the third and northernmost section of the park, the High Line at the Rail Yards, will open to the public on Sunday, September 21, 2014.

The opening of the High Line at the Rail Yards will be a momentous occasion for all of us – our neighbors, City officials, generous members and supporters, designers, construction workers, gardeners, and volunteers – who gave their time, energy, and funding over the years to save the High Line from demolition, and reimagine the very notion of what a public space could be. It will be the realization of our original dream for the High Line: to transform the entire structure, enabling visitors to walk all the way from Gansevoort Street to 34th Street. For the first time, we will all be able to walk the length of the High Line – traversing 22 city blocks, uninterrupted, 30 feet in the air, with expansive views of New York City, and the Hudson River.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Eastern Star white wood aster in bloom. Photo by Friends of the High LineEurybia divaricate ‘Eastern Star’is cultivated for its profuse flowers, which bloom in autumn. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Megan Freed
Categories: 
EnlargeJenny Gersten on the High Line. Photo by Liz Ligon

Dear Friends,

When I joined Friends of the High Line as Executive Director, I was overjoyed to take on new challenges and lead one of the most wondrous places in New York City.

It has been a privilege to work with the smart, dedicated, and passionate staff of Friends of the High Line, as well as its devoted Board of Directors, led with grace and wisdom by Chair Catie Marron.

As much as I have enjoyed this exceptional opportunity and the talented people who make this organization so extraordinary, I have come to the realization that my real desire is to return to full-time work in the arts, focusing on the kind of arts institution and cultural programming which I love most. Consequently, I will be stepping down as Executive Director following the opening of the third section, the High Line at the Rail Yards, at the end of the month. While I will be leaving this position, I will have the great pleasure of staying on as a creative consultant to the organization through the end of the year.

The lessons I take away from this experience are very special to me and I feel honored to have been part of such an inspiring group of individuals. In particular, Joshua David, who has taught me so much about the spirit, strength and determination of Friends of the High Line. The organization is fortunate to have him helping to lead Friends of the High Line as Co-Founder and President as it determines next steps regarding executive leadership.

Author: 
Rebecca Hughes
Visitors enjoy Brooklyn Soda Works on the High Line at 14th Street. Photo by Rowa LeeVisitors enjoy drinks from Brooklyn Soda Works. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

How many soda manufacturers begin production with a trip to the farmer’s market? Brooklyn Soda Works may be the first. The company’s creative process is almost as refreshing as their drinks – unlike traditional sodas on the market that combine artificial syrups with carbonated water, Brooklyn Soda Works carbonates their own cold-pressed fresh fruit juices and adds steeped herbs and spices.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Liz Ligon Participants take their spot on the line. Photo by Liz Ligon

How long is a minute?

This was the question posed by artist David Lamelas during his performance Time Line on the High Line. The interactive piece took place in three different locations throughout the park on July 22, 23, and 24. Park visitors were invited to stand along a white strip of tape and "pass along" the time. The performance began with an announcement of the time to the first participant in line. That person “held” the time for an estimated one minute, at which point they then announced the time out loud and “passed” it to the next person. Visitors were encouraged to join the line at any point and to use their native language to announce the time, thereby adding their own subjective sense of time to the performance’s duration.

So, how long is a minute? Sixty seconds.

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