High Line Blog

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Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe elegant gray birch can be found growing throughout the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe staghorn sumac, Rhus typhina, is particularly striking during the colder months. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Juan Valentin The seed heads of plants past their prime are beautiful in their winter state. The High Line’s perennials are intentionally left by our gardeners to overwinter naturally, and won’t be cut back until spring. Photos by Juan Valentin

The landscape design of the High Line is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took over during the decades after the last train rumbled by in 1980. Planting designer Piet Oudolf’s design concept for the High Line selects shrubs, trees, flowers, and grasses for their four-season interest, color, and texture. This time of year, you’ll notice an important aspect of Piet’s four-season vision: stiff stalks, architectural seed heads, and dried grasses create beauty and interest in the winter garden.

In these three elegant images High Line Photographer Juan Valentin singled out beautiful examples of plants that have gone to seed and photographed them portrait-style. From left to right, smooth sumac, Rhus glabra, swamp rose mallow, Hibiscus moscheutos ssp. palustris, and Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight,' have lost their bold hues but are striking in their winter incarnations.

Winter hours on the High Line are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM, but stay tuned to @highlinenyc on Twitter during inclement weather for updates.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeLongtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary chanced upon this poetic early morning scene in the winter of 2010.

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

This month’s image comes from longtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary. Marcin may call San Francisco home, but the course of his development as a photographer can be charted via almost-yearly visits to the High Line. Beginning in 2007 with a newly purchased DSLR and continuing through the present, Marcin has developed his photo skills while focusing his lens on the development and growth of the park.

It was during a short stint in New York in the winter of 2010 that Marcin captured this month’s mesmerizing image. Awaking in the morning to find fluffy snowflakes falling along the mile-long park was a welcome change of scenery for Marcin. As he was rushing to get out the door to document the snowfall, he spotted this scene almost serendipitously.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe Christmas fern, Polystichum acrostichoides, adds a welcome touch of green to our winter landscape. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Orrin Sheehan
Photo by Friends of the High Line. The American holly's red berries contrast beautifully with its dark green leaves. Photo by Friends of the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Oliver RichThe High Line’s operations staff work hard to keep the park’s paths clear of snow so visitors can enjoy the magical scenery that comes with winter snowfall. Photos by Oliver Rich

It’s a busy time of year for our operations staff – custodians, rangers, maintenance crew, and gardeners all chip in to help clear snow and ice as quickly as possible so the park can open to the public following winter storms. The result is a wintertime treat for visitors willing to brave the elements: the natural beauty of our winter gardens is augmented by snowfall. Snow catches in dried seed-heads, ice clusters cling to grasses, and High Line Art installations are dusted with a light powder of snowflakes.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Thank you for making 2013 an incredible year for the High Line.

We've gathered together some of our favorite images and stories from this extraordinary year. We hope you enjoy them. From all of us at Friends of the High Line, we wish you the very best in 2014.

Author: 
Anonymous
EnlargePhoto by Barry Munger

Dear Friends,

This is a bittersweet moment for me. I'm excited to be moving on, and also sad to say goodbye.

My nearly 15 years of working on the High Line has been an amazing experience in which I learned to trust my instincts. And it's these very instincts that are telling me that now is the right time to move on, both for me and for the High Line.

Preparing to leave has been much harder than I expected it would be. But as I've been saying goodbye over the past few weeks, I've realized that it's not really the High Line that I will miss. For me, it's always been about the people.

The staff who work at the park, the donors who generously support it, the volunteers who dedicate their time. The board members who lead it, the elected officials who advocate for it, the City employees who partner with us to help us keep it thriving. The designers who created it, the neighbors who have made it their own. The visitors who travel to New York City just to visit it, and all of the people who are inspired by it. People like you who believe in the High Line.

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