High Line Blog

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Author: 
Madeline Berg
Wild spurgeThis inviting flower blooms on the High Line at Little West 12th and West 16th Streets. Photo by Joan Garvin

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Caught on film: the silhouettes of High Line visitors are pronounced against a bright cut-out of the sky. Photo by Dave Bias

One of the wonderful things about photographing New York City is playing with geometry. The architectural elements of buildings layered with signage and sky create interesting shapes and contrasting colors. Within the frame of an image a photographer can create a whole different way of looking at a scene that many of us might pass by without a thought.

Seeing everyday things in a new way and working to capture their magic and whimsy has a long tradition in street photography. Photographer Dave Bias’ images reference this tradition in subject matter and composition – and on film, no less!

In an age where taking a photograph is as easy as touching a screen on your phone, it’s interesting to go back to the original tools of the trade. Bias captured this image of visitors on the High Line outlined by a triangle of sky created by the park and The Standard, High Line using a Pentax 67 camera with expired Kodak Ektachrome 220 film. This means the 6 cm x 7 cm negative is larger than the traditional 35mm (remember dropping off film at the lab… anyone? Anyone?). The expired film makes the tonal range a bit different than what it was intended, often processing a bit cooler or warmer than usual.

Share your photos – digital or otherwise – through our Flickr Pool or join the visual conversation on Instagram by tagging @highlinenyc! We would love to see your perspectives of the park!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan captured this iconic High Line aerial photograph around the time of the opening of the second section of the High Line in June 2011. Iwan photographs many of the most prominent architectural projects in the world, often turning his lens to subjects in New York. (You may also recognize him as the photographer behind the shocking New York magazine cover image of a half-dark cityscape following Hurricane Sandy.)

Iwan’s photo on this warm June evening encapsulates not only a moment in the High Line’s history, but a moment in New York City’s history. Below are a few of the “timestamps” visible in this photo:

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photos by: (First row from left) Jenna Saraco, Rowa Lee, Nicole Franzen; (Second row from left) Friends of the High Line, Nicole Franzen, Friends of the High Line; (Third row from left) Nicole Franzen, Ed Anderson courtesy of Ten Speed Press Publications, Rowa Lee.

We’re halfway through a delicious food season on the High Line. We’ve assembled some of our favorite food photos from the past year, and we think they'll make you as hungry as they made us. Before the season ends in mid-October, come to the park and enjoy gelato with your date under the stars, drink a freshly brewed cup of coffee in the still of early morning, or savor a slow-cooked, smoked brisket sandwich.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
A rendering of The Diller – von Furstenberg Building, the High Line's new operations center, located at the southern terminus of the park. Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle.

In recognition of the extraordinary generosity of The Diller – von Furstenberg Family Foundation, Friends of the High Line and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation are pleased to share the news that High Line Headquarters, our new maintenance and operations hub, will be named The Diller – von Furstenberg Building.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
At the height of its activity, the High Line was one of the city’s most prominent food distributors, delivering processed meat and baked goods to hungry New Yorkers. Photo courtesy of Kalmbach Publishing Company

As anyone who has had to pull off a Thanksgiving feast in a pinch knows, frozen turkeys can save you from familial shame, complaining guests, and a holiday meal of subpar take-out. Frozen turkeys also hold a special place for us here at the High Line, as they made up the precious cargo of the last train to ever run on the High Line.

In 1980, the railway’s final train made its way up the West Side, ending the more-than-century-long use of trains as a primary transport to and from the factories and warehouses of the Meatpacking District. While the trains began to fall into disuse in the 1950s with the rise in interstate highways and decline in manufacturing, there was a time when the tracks played an essential role in providing New York with food such as produce and meat, raw materials such as bricks and wood, manufactured goods, and other vital items, like Oreos.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Emerald Pagoda Japanese snowbellThe Emerald Pagoda Japanese snowbell has begun to bear lovely green fruit, pictured here. You can find this plant on the High Line at West 21st Street.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
High Line Photographer Phil Vachon captured this beautiful shot of a monarch butterfly as it perched on a broadleaf ironweed bloom last September. Photo by Phil Vachon

Late summer blooms are in full-swing at the High Line, and accordingly the park’s plantings are abuzz with pollinators.

This month, we’ll be celebrating one of nature’s most graceful pollinators: the monarch butterfly. At our weekly Wild Wednesday programs throughout the month of August, families are invited to learn about the lifecycle of monarch butterflies, from wriggly caterpillars to wrapped-up chrysalises, and finally to full-grown adults stretching their new wings. During an extra special session of our Wild Wednesday Creature Feature on Wednesday, August 28, our butterfly project will culminate with a release of the adult monarchs for their very first flight in the park.

If you’re not able to make it to Wild Wednesday, keep an eye out for butterflies during your next stroll along the park. Photographing winged pollinators takes patience and some luck, but gorgeous shots like this one by Phil Vachon are well worth the wait and truly capture the essence of summer.

Browse more photos in the High Line Flickr Pool or share your own.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Enlarge

Incorporating elements of the emerging microbrewery scene in New York City and drink traditions from Hong Kong, Brooklyn Soda Works has revolutionized the conventional soda. In this week's installment of Faces Behind the Food, co-owner Caroline Mak tells us about her internationally-inspired flavors like the popular lemongrass and lime. Caroline also shares how working as an installation artist has informed her new food career in helpful ways. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I’m from Hong Kong, a city with endless food offerings that have inevitably informed my own palette choices. In Hong Kong, many people brine lemons, which gives them a distinct taste. In diners, it's common to get a wedge of brined lemon in your soda. Inspired by this Hong Kong custom, we brine our own lemons every winter, and every spring, we have a salted lemon & ginger sparkling soda. We brew the brined lemons with fresh ginger juice. The result is a salty, gingery, fizzy drink with a hint of sugar.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez

The High Line and Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm recently hosted Honey Day, an annual family-friendly event that educates participants about the important role of the honeybee.

Through fun activities, honey tastings, and an open market featuring local beekeepers’ crafts and honey, participants discovered why the honeybee is our friend and an industrious worker.

Our food vendors also crafted honey-themed menus, from honey-infused beers to wildflower honey-roasted plum paletas.

Participants celebrated the honey bee and left bee-utifully inspired by nature’s wonder.

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm’s Asher Dov teaches curious children the many ways bees are important to our ecosystem using an observational beehive with more than 2,000 bees from their farm in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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