High Line Blog

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Author: 
Madeline Berg
The negative spaces between the thin and airy stems of this grass create a curtain-like effect, providing a mysterious effect.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Friends of the High Line

Earlier this week High Line staff, Summer Youth Corps, and Teen Arts Council members were thrilled to host a series of activities as part of our neighborhood's National Night Out, an afternoon and evening of festivities organized by the PSA4 Community Council, Fulton Houses Tenant Association, and Fulton Youth of the Future. National Night Out involves 15,000 communities across the United States and Canada, and even military bases abroad, with a goal of promoting safe communities and neighborhood camaraderie.

Read more and see more photos after the jump.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Arty HoursAt Arty Hours, held Saturday mornings, kids are encouraged to think creatively about the artistic process in relation to the art on view at the High Line. Photo by Elena Bernstein

Ever dream of memorializing yourself as a sculpture in a public park? These lucky kids transformed dreams into reality on July 15 by creating personalized monuments as part of Arty Hours on the High Line. In this innovative weekly program, kids create their very own masterpieces in response to different sculptures in the group exhibition Busted, currently on view. Inspired by Frank Benson’s Human Statue (Jessie), kids were encouraged to create a sculpted self-portrait as a monument using clay-like materials. Benson’s bronze statue is a life-size sculpture of a standing female dancer dressed in haute couture, with her arms gently open in an oval shape and a shield-like disc resting at her feet.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Majora Carter and Enrique PeñalosaMajora Carter and Enrique Peñalosa joined us for a lively panel discussion on equality in public spaces. “Parks were a means to an end, an end of empowerment, of joy,” said Carter, recalling her groundbreaking work in the South Bronx. Photo by Rowa Lee

Renowned urban strategists Enrique Peñalosa and Majora Carter joined us for a July 15 panel discussion on building and sustaining equality in public open space. The dynamic speakers left the audience energized and inspired—no easy feat during the throes of a heat wave.

“A good city should feel like a park,” said Enrique Peñalosa near the end of a powerful presentation. The former Mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, spoke passionately about the benefits that access to parks and other green places bring to a city’s inhabitants.

His sentiment was echoed by Majora Carter of MCG Consulting. The MacArthur “genius” Fellow and Peabody Award–winning broadcaster gave a galvanizing presentation on urban revitalization. "You don't have to move out of your neighborhood to live in a better one,” Carter told the audience.

Watch our full-length video of the talk below. Our media partner Next City provides additional coverage in “Looking for Equality in Public Spaces.”



Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Enlarge

In this week's installment of Faces Behind the Food, New York City’s friendliest barista, Caitlin McGinn of Blue Bottle Coffee, keeps us wired with fun stories about serving coffee weekly to thousands of people. Caitlin tells us about “life-changing coffees” like the New Orleans, and meaning of coffee for people from different parts of the world who visit the High Line. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I grew up in New York City, which means I've been exposed to all kinds of amazing cuisine and culture. I have also worked in restaurants since I could walk (sort of!). As such, being around delicious food, drink, and the people who create it is second nature to me. I have found an amazing community in Blue Bottle, and I am proud to represent it on the High Line. We share a common interest and passion for coffee. You can find us tasting new coffees back in our Williamsburg, Brooklyn roastery regularly. We also have education sessions where all the baristas learn about the countries where the coffee comes from, places like Brazil, Mexico, Ethiopia and Uganda.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez

Excited about our new capsule collection by J.Crew for the High Line, we invited a few friends—including neighbors and colleagues—to try on the tees and accessories in the park that inspired them. 100% of the proceeds from the purchase of this J.Crew collection support Friends of the High Line, helping us keep the High Line beautiful and inspiring for millions of visitors.

Shop the High Line and J.Crew Garments for Good collection here.

Photo by Liz Ligon

High Line supporter Stefan Gargiulo and his two daughters came over to beat the heat in the water feature on the High Line's Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. Stefan is dressed in the classic men’s vintage train tee and his sweet daughters look adorable in the kid’s watercolor map tee and the kid's Curious Garden tee, illustrated by the acclaimed children’s author, Peter Brown.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Purple Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata)This vine flower’s many intricate parts have been said to represent various aspects of the Christian crucifixion story, giving the plant its name: “passion.”

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Wave HillStanding amidst a beautiful garden of flowers is Wave Hill’s Marco Polo Stufano Conservatory, which is home to a variety of tropical and desert plants. Photo by Gigi Altarejos

This week we celebrate another green New York City gem – Wave Hill.

Earlier this summer, our friends at Wave Hill invited High Line staff and Volunteer Photographers for a visit. Join us after the jump for more details and photos from our trip.

Author: 
Programming Staff
Rail YardsTeen Arts Council member Amanda Feliciano (far left) dances with a visitor at the High Line Boardwalk, our first Teen Night. Photo by Rowa Lee.
 

On Thursday, July 18, Friends of the High Line and the High Line Teen Arts Council, welcomed more than 275 teens to the first High Line Teen Night. The theme was “High Line Boardwalk,” and visitors ate cotton candy, danced to summer jams, and tried their luck at carnival games.

Four months in the making, the event was produced entirely by local teens—and they made sure that we all had a blast! Check out more photos from the night after the jump. And mark your calendars for the second High Line Teen Night: Rising Stars, on Thursday, August 15.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Rail YardsConstruction crews braved intense heat to make repairs to the historic High Line pipe railing. After welding is completed, the new railing segment will be painted. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Despite soaring temperatures, construction crews have been making great strides preparing the final section of the High Line, which will open in 2014.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

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