High Line Blog

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Author: 
Amelia Krales
Four photographs of the High Line by Tim SchreierNew York photographer, Tim Schreier composes his frames with geometry, color, and texture in mind.

Photographer Tim Schreier's striking photos caught our eye in the High Line Flickr Pool. His images transform everyday surfaces into painterly compositions that harness light and pattern. Often a single element in the frame breaks up the repetition, adding context and depth to what might otherwise be a simple texture. Tim’s photos of the High Line bring a refreshing new perspective on park life. We couldn’t decide which image we liked best, so we’ve created a grid of four of our favorite textural High Line images from Tim's recent work.

All of this bold color reminds us of the beautiful fall hues to come. As the High Line’s landscape transitions into the new season, we will soon be surrounded by the vibrant oranges, fiery reds, and cool yellows of autumn. The visual opportunities are rich, so grab your camera and come take some photos on the High Line.

See other visitors’ photos or share your own in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Friends of the High Line A group of High Line staff members enjoy the breeze and panoramic view from the top of a hill in Freshkills Park on Staten Island. Come learn more about the park at our free talk on September 23, Beyond the High Line: Transforming Fresh Kills, Staten Island . And visit Freshkills itself on September 29 for Sneak Peak! Photo by Friends of the High Line

On Tuesday, September 10, twelve members of the High Line staff took a trip to tour Freshkills Park in Staten Island, built on the former site of the world’s largest landfill. With 2,200 acres, the park is almost three times larger than Central Park.

Freshkills is divided into five sections, most of which are not yet open to the public. However, we were given the opportunity to look behind the scenes (and up the hills and in the meadows) with Michael Callery, one of the stewards of this amazing reclaimed site.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Categories: 
Photo by Bryan Hou Photo by Bryan Hou

Fall is one our favorite seasons on the High Line – golden brown leaves, frosty morning walks, and school children enjoying nature after classes have let out. The High Line Shop has new apparel inspired by this peak of natural splendor. Follow us after the jump for a first look at new tees and accessories.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by Rowa Lee David Carrell, co-founder of People's Pops, teaches children how to freeze their own pops using a rare pop-making instrument from Thailand. Photo by Rowa Lee

Good friends Nathalie Jordi, Joel Horowitz, and David Carrell founded People’s Pops with the idea that every good popsicle is made with local, seasonal fruit, minimal sugar, and creative flavors. Taking inspiration from unique teas, cocktails, and world travels, People’s Pops was born. These delicious pops are especially popular among kids, which is why our annual Play With Your Food events welcome many giddy kids eager to make and eat pops of their own.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
A Blue Bottle Coffee employee holds up roasted beans. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Holding ourselves to a higher standard is essential here at the High Line, and this commitment is reflected in the food and drink we serve on the park. This week, we headed into Brooklyn to Blue Bottle Coffee’s roastery to bring you a first look at how we source and roast our beans and train baristas to develop their coffee palates – all so we can serve a remarkably good cup of coffee to our visitors on the High Line.

Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Steven SeveringhausWith its beautifully mottled flowers, the sinonome toad lily easily catches the eyes of passersby. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
EnlargePhoto of Friends of the High Line

In this week’s Photo of the Week, two High Line Horticulture Interns Sarah Ruiz (left) and Raquel Rosado (right) pose proudly with High Line Horticulture Educator Gahl Shottan (center) next to an edible garden they helped plant and tend at Public School 33. We’ve chosen to feature this photo to celebrate these two teens and the important contributions they’ve made to the High Line’s horticulture and the surrounding community over the two months of their internship, which just came to a close.

Sarah and Raquel graduated from the High Line’s Green Corps program in July and continued on as Horticulture Interns, working side-by-side with the park’s gardeners to help care for our plants through the rest of the summer. This season marked the second year of Green Corps – which exposes teen participants to aspects of environmental science, gardening, and what it means to work in the horticulture field – and the first season of Horticultural Internships. This new internship position uses the skills and knowledge the teens had gained in the Green Corps program as a springboard for more in-depth learning and hands-on experience.

See more photos and learn more after the jump.

Author: 
Programming Staff
Categories: 
Photo by Liz LigonTwo of our teen participants, Junemarie Gonzalez and Dajours Schoonmaker, showcase looks from designer Synderela. Photo by Liz Ligon

This August, Friends of the High Line hosted its first official public runway event – a back-to-school fashion show that was the culmination of months of work by a group of local teens. We recruited the talented teens to work with designers and create looks for our August 29 event. This select group of young fashionistas not only met with professional designers and pulled looks from their existing collections, they also designed two original pieces for Tabii Just and LaQuan Smith. Additionally, the teens were responsible for casting the models and choosing the accessories, hairstyles, and makeup that completed each look.

Keep reading for a closer look at the action.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Photographer Barry Munger captured this dreamy shot of the High Line at the Rail Yards in the summer of 2007, nearly two years before the first section of the park would open to the public. Barry has been a longtime supporter and friend of the park, often focusing his keen eye and old-school film cameras on a variety of High Line subjects.

In 2007, when this photo was taken, construction was underway on the first two sections of the High Line from Gansevoort to West 30th Streets. Section 1 of the park, running from Gansevoort to West 20th Streets, would open to the public nearly two years later, and Section 2 would open a year after that. Yet, in 2007, there was still uncertainty surrounding the High Line at the Rail Yards. It wasn’t clear whether the full vision of the High Line could be realized and this last half-mile stretch saved and transformed into public space. It would be over five years before the future of this final piece of the High Line would be secured.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

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