High Line Blog

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Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo of copper iris by Steven SeveringhausThe vibrant copper iris continues to bloom late into the season. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
A honeybee on pink flower buds Can you spot the honeybee at work in this photo? Photographer Steven Severinghaus has a knack for capturing beautiful images of plants and insects on the High Line.

The High Line’s late summer and early fall landscape is full of delicate and beautiful textures.

In Steven Severinghaus' mesmerizing macro shot, a honeybee disappears into the complex pattern made by the tiny pink buds of stonecrop, Sedum ‘Matrona.’ Stonecrop and many other hot weather blooms will be around just a little while longer before they are replaced by the textured grasses and brilliantly colored leaves that characterize the fall season.

The High Line is open 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM through September, so seize the opportunity to visit the park for an event, an evening stroll, or some delicious treats from our High Line Food vendors while the weather is still warm.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A City MomentThe delicate blooms of pink-flowered indigo spring up from the planting beds at West 16th Street. Take a moment's pause during your next visit so you don't miss them!

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Wild spurge Photo by Rowa Lee

Fall is on its way, and with the change of leaves comes a new recipe inspired by autumn’s bounty. This month, we’re presenting Terroir at The Porch’s Seasonal Farro Salad with sugar snap peas, carrots, onions, and farro. Dress this delicious salad with olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a touch of salt. The flavor of this salad pairs perfectly with a roasted butternut squash soup or vegetarian chili.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
A City MomentOn the southeast corner of West 17th Street and Tenth Avenue, visitors can enjoy an elevated view from the High Line's 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

With a population topping eight million people, there are eight million daily journeys winding their way through the city at the same time. If you have a moment to people-watch, it's fun to observe how these different lives intersect on the streets and in the public spaces of New York City. High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins has a keen eye for these moments and shared this image with us.

Suspended above a busy avenue, the High Line’s 10th Avenue Square is a unique design that allows visitors a bird’s-eye view of the hustle and bustle on the street below. Amphitheater-style seating was cut into the High Line’s original steel structure, lowering visitors beneath the level of the railway’s original track bed. Wide windows punctuated with steel beams invite viewers to sit and observe the streets below. It is the ultimate location for quiet observation of city life – a fascinating story unfolding in real time.

For more information about the park’s innovative design, pick up a copy of our book Designing the High Line: Gansevoort to West 30th Street.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Wild spurge Photo by Rowa Lee

On the High Line, our food vendors are always rotating their menus inspired by the changing seasons. Celebrate the final days of summer with The Taco Truck’s Fresh Tomatillo Salsa recipe, which will add a hint of acid and spice to your late summer meals. This delicious salad contains serrano chiles, a handful of fresh cilantro, garlic, a touch of salt, and plenty of tomatillos. This dish pairs beautifully with any grilled fish or as a burger topping.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Wild spurgeThis inviting flower blooms on the High Line at Little West 12th and West 16th Streets. Photo by Joan Garvin

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Caught on film: the silhouettes of High Line visitors are pronounced against a bright cut-out of the sky. Photo by Dave Bias

One of the wonderful things about photographing New York City is playing with geometry. The architectural elements of buildings layered with signage and sky create interesting shapes and contrasting colors. Within the frame of an image a photographer can create a whole different way of looking at a scene that many of us might pass by without a thought.

Seeing everyday things in a new way and working to capture their magic and whimsy has a long tradition in street photography. Photographer Dave Bias’ images reference this tradition in subject matter and composition – and on film, no less!

In an age where taking a photograph is as easy as touching a screen on your phone, it’s interesting to go back to the original tools of the trade. Bias captured this image of visitors on the High Line outlined by a triangle of sky created by the park and The Standard, High Line using a Pentax 67 camera with expired Kodak Ektachrome 220 film. This means the 6 cm x 7 cm negative is larger than the traditional 35mm (remember dropping off film at the lab… anyone? Anyone?). The expired film makes the tonal range a bit different than what it was intended, often processing a bit cooler or warmer than usual.

Share your photos – digital or otherwise – through our Flickr Pool or join the visual conversation on Instagram by tagging @highlinenyc! We would love to see your perspectives of the park!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan captured this iconic High Line aerial photograph around the time of the opening of the second section of the High Line in June 2011. Iwan photographs many of the most prominent architectural projects in the world, often turning his lens to subjects in New York. (You may also recognize him as the photographer behind the shocking New York magazine cover image of a half-dark cityscape following Hurricane Sandy.)

Iwan’s photo on this warm June evening encapsulates not only a moment in the High Line’s history, but a moment in New York City’s history. Below are a few of the “timestamps” visible in this photo:

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photos by: (First row from left) Jenna Saraco, Rowa Lee, Nicole Franzen; (Second row from left) Friends of the High Line, Nicole Franzen, Friends of the High Line; (Third row from left) Nicole Franzen, Ed Anderson courtesy of Ten Speed Press Publications, Rowa Lee.

We’re halfway through a delicious food season on the High Line. We’ve assembled some of our favorite food photos from the past year, and we think they'll make you as hungry as they made us. Before the season ends in mid-October, come to the park and enjoy gelato with your date under the stars, drink a freshly brewed cup of coffee in the still of early morning, or savor a slow-cooked, smoked brisket sandwich.

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