High Line Blog

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Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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Learning to bake cookies alongside his nurturing mother, Julian Plyter of Melt Bakery unknowingly discovered his life’swork . In this installment of Faces Behind the Food, Julian shares memories from his childhood, when he first learned to roll out cookie dough and used fruit picked ripe for his cookies. This early introduction to baking led Julian to pursue baking professionally and open up the beloved Melt Bakery. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I have been an avid supporter of local food since I was a kid, picking peaches in my great-grandfather's backyard, picking cherries with my mom from our own tree, and planting and cultivating gardens with my family. I am also a classically trained pianist, although it's been a while; not sure if there's any talent left in that pool! My favorite composer to play was always Chopin. My paternal grandmother was actually my first piano teacher, and she gave me many of my beloved cookie recipes as well.

The earliest memory I have is rolling cookie dough at the age of four using old-fashioned tools like cherry pitters and wooden spoons belonging to my grandmother. We had orange-and-green wallpaper in the kitchen that I can still visualize, too. My mother inspired my love of baking. I’ve spent countless hours beside my mother learning to replicate her recipes, but no one can make better cinnamon buns than she. In our hometown, she also reigns as queen of homemade pies. The classic Melt cookie is a chocolate-chip walnut, adapted from one of my mother’s old recipes.

Author: 
Programming Staff
Free Teen Night on July 18, 2013Our Teen Arts Council has been hard at work planning our first Teen Night. Photo by Beverly Israely
 

Friends of the High Line is excited to present its first ever Teen Night this Thursday, July 18, at 6:00 PM in the 14th Street Passage. This boardwalk-themed evening is the first of two fun events planned by our very own Teen Arts Council, or TAC.

Our TAC team is a group of ten local teens we’ve hired to plan two awesome party nights for New York City teens this summer. For the past five months they have met on a weekly basis—attending other teen events around the city and meeting with other teen groups in preparation of producing their own event. And the night has finally arrived!

This Thursday’s event, High Line Boardwalk, will include carnival games, tasty treat, great music by DJ empanadamn, and even some fortune telling.

Whether you want to challenge yourself at the dunk tank, dance into the evening, leave with some hard-earned prizes, or enjoy the tasty, free food, just make sure not to miss this fun event. High Line Boardwalk will begin at 6:00 PM and ends at 9:30 PM.

If you’d like to make a music request, please share it on the Facebook event page.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Green Corps GraduatesWearing big smiles, this year's Green Corps graduates hold up their certificates.
 

The High Line Green Corps program saw its first graduation on Saturday, June 28, with proud mothers and siblings in attendance. “How can we be better neighbors?” was the thoughtful question leading to the creation of the High Line’s Green Corps program—an intensive six-month paid program for local teens that increases understanding of environmental science and green jobs, while also strengthening the relationship between the High Line and its young community members. This year’s graduating class was especially passionate and lively—a testament to the program’s success.

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The graduates shared highlights of the program in between eating a delicious spread of rice and beans and turkey empanadas cooked by the teens. Graduate Beatrice Ramos—with her young sister listening—spoke about the new sense of responsibility the program instilled in her. “I recycle now and know the benefits of keeping my city clean,” she said. Echoing her sentiment, graduate Raquel Rosado shared, “I’ve learned to love plants. Now it’s my job to care for them.”

The program’s instructors, Gahl Shottan and Jordan Aponte, aim to do precisely that—encourage young teens to see themselves as environmental stewards of the city, whether they are on the High Line or in any other green space. The program focuses on: green infrastructure, urban horticulture, and agricultural sustainability- including the relationship between food and health. Students learn through field trips, presentations with guest speakers, and team hands-on projects. This year's Green Corps weeded the garden at a local elementary school, P.S. 33, planted bulbs in nearby tree pits, and cut back over a quarter-mile of plantings as part of the High Line’s annual Spring Cutback.

Green Corps began last year as a week-long alternative spring break, through generous support from the Nathan Cummings Foundation. Over 60 applicants, many from local NYCHA complexes, applied for the ten spots in this pilot week. Friends of the High Line realized there was a need for this kind of programming. One graduate from last year, Carla Hernandez, went on to enter the Green City Force's Clean Energy Corps. Through support from the Ford Foundation and the Palette Fund, the breadth and scope of this year's program has expanded.

Author: 
Programming Staff
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If you have been on the High Line in the past few weeks, you might have noticed a lot of changes: the park feels lush and green again, the Chelsea Market passage is buzzing with visitors, and we have some new faces among our dedicated staff.

We want to take this moment to introduce two new staff members, Liza Rosado and Javier Montero. Liza has joined the Merchandise team as a Sales Associate, selling wonderful High Line gear that directly supports our operation. And Javier has joined our visitor services team as a High Line Ranger. While these are new roles for both of them, Liza and Javier have been part of the High Line family for more than a year now.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo of the WeekHigh Line benches offer a relaxing way to unwind after a hot summer day. Photo by Jake Marsiglia
 

Summer means long, hot (or rainy, as it seems recently) days and longer evening hours on the High Line. This throwback image by photographer Jake Marsiglia captures the essence of a summer night on the High Line: a visitor takes in the New York City night sky while enjoying the cool breeze that sweeps over the park after the sun sets.

The High Line is open daily until 11:00 PM all summer, so stop by after a hot day for a stroll or to enjoy one of the many events we offer during the evenings. One of our favorite summer activities is gazing at the constellations through high-powered telescopes during Tuesday night Stargazing. Weekly through October, the Amateur Astronomers Association provides High Line visitors a chance to look through powerful telescopes to view stars and planets not always visible to the naked eye.

Learn more about our weekly Stargazing program.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Damaris FontanesDamaris Fontanes, donning a cute pink bandana and her SmokeLine tee, flashes us her famous smile. Photo by Armando Rafael Photography
 

Whether she’s hula-hooping at a concert or serving up delicious BBQ, Damaris Fontanes, manager of Delaney Barbecue’s SmokeLine, does it in good humor and with a contagious smile. In this installment of Faces Behind the Food, Damaris shares stories about international visitors to the High Line who find creatively sweet, wordless ways of saying thanks and how she began her career in food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Wild QuinineWild quinine grows on the High Line from West 16th through West 20th Streets.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Friends of the High LineA view from the end of the High Line at West 30th Street offers a front row seat to the construction and expansion happening on the final section of the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

When construction is complete, The High Line at the Rail Yards will stretch one half mile from West 30th Street to West 34th Street. The design renderings show a meandering path that will offer sweeping views of the Hudson River and a birds-eye view of the Hudson Rail Yards, now home to off-duty MTA trains.

Follow us after the jump to learn more.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Dig in: Pizza with sausage, peppers, mozzarella, and tomato at The Standard Plaza. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

Although we’re (overly?) fond of the luscious tacos and ice-cream sandwiches our food vendors offer on the High Line, we do occasionally supplement our diets with delectable food prepared by our neighbors. When our friends at The Standard Plaza tempted us with words like “pizza” and “tequila,” we knew we had to schedule a lunch at the open-air restaurant at West 13th and Washington Streets. To keep the memories as fresh as the creamy burrata, we filmed the whole thing.

The next time you’re in the mood for rosé sangria and gourmet pizza, stop by The Standard Plaza, at The Standard, High Line, at 848 Washington Street. Keep reading for a mouthwatering account of our visit.

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”It’s 6 o’clock somewhere!” The Dolores has spiced tequila and sumac salt for kick. Pimm’s, grapefruit, cucumber and mint mingle beautifully in the Copa Inglesa.
















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Rich, buttery burrata tops warm bread—the table let out an “Ooooh” when this bad boy arrived. The roasted cauliflower and asparagus appetizers behind the burrata were less sinful but just as flavorful.
















Author: 
Madeline Berg
Hula Dancer pale purple coneflower The Hula Dancer pale purple coneflower blooms on the High Line at 15th Street and between 27th and 28th Streets.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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