High Line Blog

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Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by @aloarowa

There are very few (good) reasons to awake at 5:30 AM, but the promise of a picturesque sunrise and room to roam brought out a snap-happy group of Instagrammers to the park on Wednesday, July 23. We joined with Instagram to welcome a small group to visit the park before it opened and document their adventures. The event, #emptyhighline, produced dozens of beautiful shots that captured the park in an early morning glow.

Check out some of our favorites below, and follow @highlinenyc and @highlineartnyc for more beautiful photos of the park.

Author: 
Marek Pundzak
Shenandoah red switch grass in the summer. Photo by Friends of the High LineShenandoah red switch grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’) is accented by airy reddish-pink panicles in the summer. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
The High Line in summer. Photo by Juan ValentinThe High Line's gardens are lush with blooms and green growth in the summer. Photo by Juan Valentin

There's nothing like a brutal, overlong winter to make one appreciate a summer garden. On those days when the sun is hot and you're tempted to hurry by beautiful blooms, remember this. And this. And that mid-April snow-ice-storm that brought our long-awaited #CrocusWatch2014 to a harsh and unceremonious end.

Treasure the miracle that is the summer garden.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Gardener John GundersonGardener John Gunderson has been with Friends of the High Line since 2011. Photo by Friends of the High Line

While the High Line is meant to look like a wild landscape, it requires an extraordinary amount of work to maintain the plant life. The horticulture team is responsible for maintaining the park’s more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees. In our first Staff Spotlight, we’re focusing on John Gunderson, a gardener who’s been with Friends of the High Line for three years.

Author: 
Marek Pundzak
Clerodendrum trichotomum in bloom. Photo by Friends of the High LineIn late summer, Clerodendrum trichotomum's tubular white flowers fill the air with their sweet fragrance. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Joshua David and Robert Hammond at the Rail YardsFriends of the High Line Co-founders Joshua David (left) and Robert Hammond (right) on the Rail Yards section of the High Line in 2001. Photo by Joel Sternfeld, courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

On this day 15 years ago, an article on the High Line ran in the New York Times. In it, a new idea was proposed for the elevated rail, which was slated for demolition at the time. CSX Transportation Inc., which had just acquired the derelict railway, hoped that it might be converted into public space via the federal “Rail to Trails” program.

In what would be a turning point for the historic structure, two men who didn’t know one another at the time – Joshua David and Robert Hammond – read the article and felt moved to change the High Line’s fate. In a sense, today marks the true 15th birthday of Friends of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A honeybee enjoys the High Line. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA honeybee enjoys a visit to the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

In anticipation of High Line Honey Day on July 30, we’re exploring the world of honeybees. We invited Dan Carr, Assistant Livestock Manager at Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, to introduce our readers to this industrious little insect. Stone Barns Center is a non-profit farm and education center located in Westchester County, New York. In addition to caring for honeybees, Dan and the Livestock Staff members oversee sheep, pigs, chickens, and other animals.

Author: 
Marek Pundzak
Sea lavender (Limonium platyphyllum) in bloom on the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High LineThe lovely sea lavender (Limonium platyphyllum) is in bloom on the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Supermoon over the High Line. Photo by Mike TschappatOn Friday evening and early Saturday morning this past week, New Yorkers were treated to a larger-than-life moon, or “supermoon.” Photo by Mike Tschappat

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured this striking photo of a “supermoon” last Friday, while perched on the High Line with his long lens and tripod. A supermoon is exactly what it sounds like: a larger-than-life appearance of a full moon. This celestial event – which has the unfortunate and un-catchy scientific designation of “perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system” – happens when a full moon coincides with the moment in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to the earth. This results in a noticeably larger-than-normal appearance of the moon in the night’s sky. Happily, we have two more supermoons to look forward to this summer – one on August 10 and another on September 9.

Author: 
Emily Pinkowitz
2014 Teen Arts Council. Photo by Friends of the High LineThe Teen Arts Council: Our group is small; our vision is big – taking Friends of the High Line into the future! Photo by Friends of the High Line

This blog post was written by Teen Arts Council members William Natal, Eva Polanco, and Pedro Hidalgo.

The Teen Arts Council, or TAC, is a group of teenagers who are seasonally employed by Friends of the High Line. While working at the High Line, TAC plans, organizes, and creates two teen nights each July and August in the the park's 14th Street Passage. Come meet us at our first event, 90s in NYC, on Thursday, July 17. Read more about us after the jump!

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