High Line Blog

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Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
EnlargePhoto by Charlie Maffei

From tasteful nudes to tasty (risotto) balls, there are many different ways to celebrate Pride Week on the High Line.

Due to large crowds anticipated in Chelsea for NYC Pride festivities, the New York City Police Department and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation ask us to close early the day of the parade—at 6:00 PM on Sunday, June 30. Until then, however, we invite you to try out special Pride Week dishes at our food vendors. And if you don’t feel like spending any cash, it’s always free to sit on the steps at 10th Avenue Square and watch the fabulously diverse crowd strut their stuff.

Rainbow Salad with Sausage & Balls at Terroir

In celebration of Pride Week, our open-air café at West 15th Street will be serving a “Loud and Proud Rainbow Salad.” Available through June 30, the colorful salad consists of mixed baby lettuce, radish, carrot, golden beets, snap peas, red onion, and lemon vinaigrette. Terroir is also getting a little saucier with a “Sausage and Balls” special for the weekend, so be sure to leave room for this dish of house-made sage leaf lamb sausage with beet and Gorgonzola risotto balls.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
To mark the first day of summer, we’re sharing one of our favorite early summer blooms, Astilbe Chinensis 'Visions in Pink,' one of the many plant species thriving on the High Line this season. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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Francesco Realmuto, owner of L’arte del Gelato, talks about his knack for cooking the particularly tricky eggplant, beloved in Sicily, and his favorite employee memory of a couple who left their home country to create a new life here in New York City. Meet Francesco in our latest installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Mexican feather grassMexican feather grass is flourishing on the High Line after days of spring rain.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Nominees clockwise from left: Dorothy Parker, Peter Obletz, Magda Sawon, Daniel Reddan, and Florent Morellet. Photo of Peter Obletz by Peter Richards, photo of Dorothy Parker by unknown photographer.
 

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s latest group exhibition, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public—for our #GetBusted contest.

You nominated a lot of great people for the first part of our contest. It was difficult task, but we were able to whittle the list down to five incredible nominees. You can vote for your favorite nominee once a day through 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday, July 1.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Sunset at Terroir at The PorchThere's nothing like a bottle of crisp white wine on a summer evening at The Porch. Photo by Nicole Franzen

Paul Grieco of Terroir absolutely loves wine. He reminds us of a learned Bacchus—the Roman god of wine as scholar. In celebration of summer, Grieco is introducing a white wine of the week (say that eight times fast) at Terroir at The Porch—the open-air café serving wine, beer, and small plates on the High Line at West 15th Street.

The first featured wine is a 2012 Sauvignon blanc by Lieu Dit of Santa Ynez Valley, California. It is available through Friday, June 21, for $13 a glass and $52 a bottle. Grieco’s description of the vintage is as funny as it is rapturous, so we’re including the whole thing below:

Author: 
Amelia Krales
One of the High Line’s many “peel-up” benches basks in the summer sun against a backdrop of Full Moon Tickseed, Walker's Low Persian catmint, and Siberian catmint. Photo by Eddie Crimmins
 

Given the rainy streak New Yorkers have endured in the past few weeks, it’s hard to believe that the official beginning of summer is just around the corner.

As a reminder of the warmer days ahead, this week’s Photo of the Week by photographer Eddie Crimmins captures a quiet summer moment on the High Line. This west-facing bench at West 24th Street invites visitors to take respite from the city’s hustle and bustle, and soak in the sun with a friend or a good book.

The warm days to come are also bringing back many iconic High Line events! Join us for a taste of summer with a wide variety of programs that are free and open to all ages.

Stargaze with the Amateur Astronomers Association, dance to some live Latin music by Orlando Marin, the Last Mambo King, or take a walking tour of the park – all happening this next week! On Friday, June 21, the evening of the summer solstice, sit amongst the greenery on the High Line at Little West 12th Street to experience Crickets, a High Line Art performance piece by artist Mungo Thompson, inspired by the melodies of nature’s tiniest musicians.

Learn more about these and other events.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Although we’re partial to green (and brown), we think the High Line looks fabulous in pink. Diane von Furstenberg created a rose-colored map of the High Line, which includes tips and the designer’s top spots, in celebration of her new Accessories Shop at 440 West 14th Street. You can pick up a copy of the map at our High Line Shop and our Information Station, both located in the Chelsea Market Passage at West 16th Street.

A PDF is also available for download here.



Author: 
Erika Harvey
In June, the High Line’s various grasses thicken turning the park’s planting beds into a verdant backdrop for the showy blooms of foxtail lilies. Photo by Juan Valentin
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
A nighttime view from West 23rd Street, looking north toward Hudson Yards, where Coach will be an anchor tenant in a new tower under construction at West 30th Street and 10th Avenue. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are pleased to share exciting news: Coach has made a $5 million gift to the Campaign for the High Line, a fundraising effort to open the High Line at the Rail Yards and build an endowment to sustain the park’s long-term maintenance and operations. This generous gift, made by Coach’s philanthropic foundation, marks a major step toward opening the entire elevated railway to visitors and sustaining the park for future generations to enjoy.

The company will be the anchor tenant in a Hudson Yards tower that will straddle the High Line at the Rail Yards, resulting in a new semi-enclosed passageway that will be the High Line’s largest covered area when the park opens in 2014. In recognition of Coach’s essential contribution to the High Line and the neighborhood it has served for over 70 years, this passageway will be named the “Coach Passage.”

View the press release, or read about it in The New York Times

When you read about inspiring acts of generosity like this one from Coach, it is easy to assume that your own gift may no longer be needed. But please don't forget: We still depend on all of our friends and supporters to maintain and operate the High Line.

Coach’s extraordinary gift will support the expansion of the High Line and help ensure its security for the future, but the day-to-day operations of the park continue to depend on the sustaining support of our neighbors and friends.

As part of our agreement with the City of New York, each year we raise the essential private funding to support 90% of the High Line's operating budget. Custodians, gardeners, educators, mechanics, rangers, technicians—every person you see in the park in a High Line uniform is employed by Friends of the High Line. The City of New York provides for security and utility services, while the rest of the park’s operations budget, as well as the entirety of its administrative budget, are supported by donations secured by Friends of the High Line.

That means when you give to Friends of the High Line, you are helping us make sure that this special public space is always maintained and operated at the high standards we have come to love. We thank all of our members and supporters for their vision in building the High Line, their wisdom in securing its stability for the future, and their ongoing generosity in sustaining it today.

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