High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors on a rainy day are surprised by Human Statue (Jessie). Photo by Oliver Rich
 

High Line Art's newest group exhibition, Busted, has been turning heads in the park.

Busted features commissions from nine international artists, all playing with the popular tradition of urban monuments and civic landmarks that have defined public spaces for centuries. Pieces range from the abstract and conceptual, to interpretive portraits and the hyper-realistic.

New York-based artist Frank Benson's commission, Human Statue (Jessie), features a life-like bronze statue of a woman atop a small pedestal, poised with arms gently open. Her placement in an outdoor setting like the High Line has caused many visitors to do a double-take, mistaking her for a living statue performer. Sit long enough on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck and you'll surely hear someone say something like, "I've seen many street performers, but she's really good."

High Line Photographer Oliver Rich captured one such interesting interaction here, as two visitors are surprised by Jessie's presence on a rainy day.

Download a printable High Line Art map.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Fany Gerson, the chef and owner of LaNewyorkina, shows off her skills to some of our younger guests at the Seating Steps, on the High Line at West 22nd Street. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

From a bride and groom eating coconut paletas to what happens when kids walk away with the toppings, Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina shares her favorite customer memories in our new weekly series, Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

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I love making people happy and creating memories with food, which is why I am the proud owner and chef of La Newyorkina. I have been a chef for over ten years and have loved food my whole life. When I was one year old, my father gave me two dozen chocolate truffles as a present, not realizing I would eat almost all in one sitting! We often have visitors from far away like New Zealand, Australia, and Israel that come to the stand to tell us a friend of theirs told them they had to taste our paletas. That means the world to me, especially because they get to experience part of my culture, which is a mission of mine.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Photo by Tom Kletecka.

Later this season, Danya Sherman, our Director of Public Programs, Education & Community Engagement, will be moving on from Friends of the High Line to pursue a graduate degree in urban planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.

Though she will stay with us through June to help transition her successor, we want to take a moment to reflect on her positive impact and share our personal experience working with her.

Follow us after the jump for photos and anecdotes from the High Line community.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This month, stop by to enjoy the pale purple flowers of Purple Smoke wild indigo, in bloom at West 16th and West 18th Streets.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Spring really is here: the 23rd Street Lawn is open. Photo by Navid Baraty.

Get ready for some serious people-watching. The 23rd Street Lawn has officially re-opened for the busy season ahead. Pack a picnic, slide on your darkest shades (better for people-watching), and head out to the High Line to enjoy the park’s one and only lawn.

Like last year, the 23rd Street Lawn will be open Wednesdays through Sundays. The grass needs to recover after entertaining guests all weekend—an average of eighty-thousand during the summer months—which makes it necessary for us to close the Lawn on Mondays and Tuesdays*. This is just one of the many challenges of maintaining such a popular green space. “It’s really hard to keep it looking good and green with so much traffic throughout the summer,” says High Line Gardener Maeve Turner. Using organic products, she’s developed a program that’s kept the Lawn healthy since its grand opening in 2011.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
A rainy day scene from earlier this week. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

One of my favorite times to visit the park in the spring is right after a heavy rainfall. The plants glisten with dewdrops, and the pathway is clear of the usual crowds, allowing for a peaceful and serene meander through the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Stop by to enjoy the white flowers of this woodland succulent, native to the eastern United States, this time of year.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Goshka Macuga, Colin Powell, 2009. Part of Busted, a HIGH LINE COMMISSION. On view April 2013 – April 2014 on the High Line, New York. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

We’re excited to bring you a fantastic spring season of art on the High Line, with new commissions, installations, and video screenings by acclaimed artists. Our overview of what’s on view takes you northward, from Gansevoort Street to the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Visitors walk along the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover as the pathway ramps up just north of West 25th Street.
Photo by Karen Blumberg

High Line Photographer Karen Blumberg captured this lush springtime shot last week of the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, the elevated walkway on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets.

The Falcone Flyover is a subtle design feature that complements the natural microclimate found in this stretch of the park. North of West 25th Street, visitors find that the historic warehouse buildings draw closer to the historic railway, protecting this section from the wind and creating a naturally shady environment that captures moisture. When Joel Sternfeld photographed this area in the year 2000, it was home to tall sumacs and a thick understory.

When the High Line Design Team of James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf turned their attention to this area of the High Line, they looked to work with and celebrate the natural microclimate created by the close proximity of buildings when creating the design for the park.

Now, along the Falcone Flyover, a pathway ramps up gently to a height of eight feet above the ground, carrying visitors through a canopy of magnolias, sassafras, and serviceberry trees. This time of year, spring blooms like Solomon’s seal, red baneberry, a variety of phlox, and vibrant green mosses cover the forest floor, and the canopy is growing thicker with trees’ leaves.

Take your time while walking the Falcone Flyover next time you're at the High Line to enjoy seasonal foliage and blooms.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Between West 25th and West 27th Streets, the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover rises over a variety of shade-loving plants, like Solomon’s seal.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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