High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Red Sprite winterberry produces vibrant red berries during the winter months of the year, adding color to the High Line’s winter landscape.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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High Line Photographer Oliver Rich braved the cold to capture this serene early-morning scene following a light snowfall this past Saturday.

While it wasn’t quite enough snow to call our Snow Volunteers into action or hold our much-anticipated High Line Snow Sculpt-Off, early birds were treated to a beautiful scene. The light dusting of snow blanketed the High Line’s plants, railings, and walkways and transformed the park into a veritable winter wonderland.

See more wintery photos or share your own in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The copper string-like petals of the Jelena witch hazel blooms on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Soft dried grasses along the High Line contrast with the hard architectural lines of a neighboring building. Photo by Herve Dulongcourty
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Chef and owner of La Newyorkina, Fany Gerson creates frozen treats inspired by her native Mexico. Much of the equipment in her Red Hook-based kitchen was destroyed by flooding during Hurricane Sandy. Photo courtesy of La Newyorkina
 

It’s freezing cold in New York City, but the winter weather is not stopping us from dreaming about summer, a time when bergamot is blooming, bees are buzzing, and paletas are plentiful on the High Line.

Alas, we were saddened to hear that the Red Hook headquarters of La Newyorkina, one of our beloved High Line food vendors, were devastated by severe flooding during Hurricane Sandy.

Chef/owner Fany Gerson wants to rebuild the kitchen equipment, but she needs help. Follow us after the jump to learn more and watch her Kickstarter video.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

We are getting ready to print the third edition of the High Line Map. Follow us after the jump to see the finalists and vote for your favorite.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Emerald Sentinel Eastern red cedar produces deep blue berries in the winter months, providing an important food source for song birds at the High Line.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A Northern Mockingbird discovers delicious berries on the High Line’s winter landscape. Photo by Matt MacGillivray
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Bundle up and get ready for some wintertime exercise. Join our team of snow volunteers. Photo by Marcin Wichary
 

It's all hands on deck when snow arrives in New York City, and we'd love your help!

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
 

In celebration of Richard Artschwager’s blp installation, High Line Art, the Whitney Museum, and The Standard, New York, invite you to participate in the collective documentation of the project.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the contest!

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