High Line Blog

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Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Virginia OvertonInstallation view of Virginia Overton's Untitled in the stacked parking lot next to the High Line at West 20th Street. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

Hidden among the shiny cars in the tiered parking lot next to the High Line at West 20th Street rests a modest looking pickup truck. At first glance, this 1994 2WD Toyota appears to be just another vehicle waiting for its owner to take it for a ride, but look closely. As the brick-filled bed begins to materialize, the piece start to fall into place.

Follow us after the break to learn more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Chelsea GrasslandsThe High Line’s gray birch trees offer a last burst of fall color on the park’s landscape.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Chelsea GrasslandsHigh Line Art Production Manager Jordan Benke working on sections of pressed tin. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

We are in the final stages of installing El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II, a monumental sculpture hanging from an exterior wall next to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Street.

Follow us after the break to learn more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Chelsea GrasslandsNow is the time to enjoy the brilliant seasonal foliage of swamp azalea on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets. Photo by Josiah Lau
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Main image - gift guide

Visit the High Line Web Shop to find exclusive holiday gifts and fun stocking stuffers for all ages.

As we enter the holiday season, consider giving special people in your life a gift from the High Line. Our apparel, products, and books are perfect for architecture geeks, design enthusiasts, green thumbs, urban planners, and children alike. What’s more, every purchase from our High Line Web Shop directly supports the High Line’s ongoing maintenance, helping us keep the park beautiful, clean, and welcoming all year long.

Follow us after the jump to see our favorite gift ideas for the 2012 holiday season.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photos by (left and upper right) Rowa Lee and (lower right) Juan Valentin
 

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for the High Line. We’ve been so busy with recovery from Hurricane Sandy that we haven’t yet had a chance to share photos and stories from our favorite fall community event: Haunted High Line Halloween.

On Saturday, October 27, hundreds of families brought their Halloween spirit to the High Line for a spooky scavenger hunt, tasty treats, a dress-up photo booth, a pop-up pumpkin patch, face painting, live jazz and swing music, and more.

Join us after the jump for more photos and details about the event.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Chelsea GrasslandsThis photograph was taken the day after the hurricane, and shows how the High Line’s plantings escaped major damage. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

This week, as many visitors came to the High Line to seek a respite from the storm flooding and power outages, we were often asked how the landscape managed to escape harm from Hurricane Sandy and the subsequent snow storm.

Given the magnitude of the hurricane, it was inevitable that the High Line would sustain some damage. Like many other buildings along Manhattan’s West Side, saltwater flooding during the storm surge damaged the park’s underground utility connections, but fortunately the vast majority of the High Line’s plantings are intact.

As you can see in the above photograph, which was taken the day after Hurricane Sandy, the High Line’s landscape is in great shape following the severe weather. With the exception of a handful of small, uprooted trees, all the along the park you see a thriving landscape with autumnal blooms, grasses gone to seed, and the last of the season’s fall foliage.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the park’s landscape, and view more recent photos of the plantings.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
A view of West 22nd Street the morning after Hurricane Sandy. Photo courtesy Friends of the High Line.
 

Last week New York City was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, leaving much of West Chelsea under several feet of water. Follow us after the jump to learn more about the storm’s impact on High Line Art and the art community on Manhattan’s West Side.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The High Line will reopen on Monday, November 5 and operate on a limited schedule until further notice. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

We have wonderful news to share. After being closed for a week due to severe weather and flooding caused by Hurricane Sandy, the High Line will reopen on Monday, November 5, 2012.

We are relieved that the High Line's plantings, design features, and artworks are in great shape following the storm. However, due to significant damage to some of the park’s utility connections, the High Line will be operating on a temporary schedule. Until further notice, the park will be open daily between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and get important park updates.

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