High Line Blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Rail Yards Weekends Wrap-Up: main imageA final look at the High Line at the Rail Yards before construction begins. Clockwise from upper right, photos by Beverly Israely, Liz Ligon, Liz Ligon
 

The High Line’s final section is currently closed to visitors, but earlier this month more than 1,600 people explored the final stretch of elevated railway as part of Rail Yards Weekends, a series of self-guided walking tours in celebration of the one-year anniversary of UNIQLO’s Fifth Avenue Global Flagship Store opening, the Japanese clothing retailer’s support of the High Line’s ongoing maintenance and park operations, and the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend.

Follow us after the jump to view visitor photos, watch video, and check out photo essays and press coverage.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Cutleaf Staghorn sumac is just one of several varieties of sumac grown at the High Line. Sumac trees are known for their brilliant fall foliage. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful aerial photo gives a different perspective of the High Line and the surrounding city. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

High Line Photographer Melissa Mansur captured this amazing rainy day aerial photo of the High Line during an openhousenewyork tour at The Standard, New York last weekend.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Under The Standard, New YorkTartarian aster is just one of the many varieties of aster you’ll find in bloom at the High Line this season. The plants’ distinctive lavender blooms are a sure sign that autumn has arrived at the park.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Colicchio and SonsOur signature fall fundraiser, hosted at Colicchio & Sons, featured food and drink from the neighborhood's best chefs. Photos by Liz Ligon
 

We would like to thank Tom Colicchio of Colicchio & Sons for partnering with Friends of the High Line to present our third annual High Line Chefs Dinner on Sunday, September 30. Over 200 guests enjoyed delicious cocktails and small plates crafted by world-renowned chefs from the High Line neighborhood, all in support of the ongoing maintenance and operations of the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
With cascading branches containing pea-like blooms, Gibraltar bush clover is a visitor favorite at this time of year on the High Line.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Deb Berman, High Line Art's invaluable intern, installing a test filmstrip this past summer for artist Jennifer West's performance One Mile Parkour Film. Photo courtesy Friends of the High Line.
 

This week we bid farewell to Deb Berman, our invaluable High Line Art intern. A recent graduate from the University of Southern California, Deb has assisted our staff in countless ways since she joined our team in the spring.

Join us after the jump to read more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 
Summer blooms may be fading, but brilliant fall foliage is right around the corner. Photo by Juan Valentin
 

It’s officially fall in New York City!

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park throughout the four seasons.

Now that temperatures are cooling and the first hints of fall color are appearing in the planting beds, it’s the perfect time to enjoy crisp evening walks, beautiful fall foliage, seasonal treats from our food vendors, new art commissions, and free public programs for the entire family.

Join us after the jump to see some of our favorite autumnal photos from years past and get a taste of what’s to come this fall.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Pick up a copy from one of the stands along 10th Avenue, or follow us after the jump to read the article. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Last month we introduced you to Erycka Montoya Perez, our new Community Engagement Manager at Friends of the High Line. One of our favorite local newspapers, Chelsea Now, recently spoke with Erycka about her experience thus far and her plans for the High Line.

Follow us after the jump to read the article, watch a short video, and see photos from recent community engagement activities.

Pages