The High Line Blog

  • Spring Cutback 2018: Become a Volunteer

    In keeping with planting designer Piet Oudolf's vision, High Line plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather as they are in most gardens. When spring arrives, the plants must be trimmed back to make way for new growth.During this monumental horticultural effort, called Spring Cut... read more
  • Plant of the Week: White turtlehead

    In the midst of harsh winter, gardens on the High Line continue to offer a glimpse of wild nature. Here, the perennials that have already finished this season's growth are left uncut until early spring. These plants display their natural forms and structures more prominently now than any other... read more
  • Plant of the Week: The Aster Family

    For this Plant of the Week post, I focused on a plant family, rather than a single species. The winter structure this family brings is crucial to the overall feel of a Piet Oudolf garden in winter. As the largest dicot family with over 23,000 species of herbs, shrubs, and trees with an almost ... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Winter sun mahonia

    Mahonia x media 'Winter Sun' is small to medium-sized evergreen shrub capable of growing ten feet tall and five feet wide. It becomes a prized specimen when it blooms in the late fall or early winter, producing fragrant yellow flowers. These inflorescences develop into clusters of waxy blue be... read more
  • Gardening in the Sky: Preserving Local Character

    Many plant species native to New York also grow in climates that are drastically different from ours. For example, wild bergamot's ( Monarda fistulosa) native range extends through Canada and nearly every state in the continental US. In Mississippi, nursery growers found a population of wild... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Early goldenrod

    When a snow-laden goldenrod leans into your path along the Western Rail Yards, seize the opportunity to take a closer look at its gritty structure. Dense panicles of ripe seed are held on stiff stems that bear high winds and sleet for the coming months. It takes a weed like Solidago juncea, the ... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Rose mallow

    This December, we've already had two snow storms on the High Line, which is a dramatic difference from last December's unseasonably warm weather. Right now our perennials are blanketed under a layer of fresh snow, and it looks winteresque here. One of our more striking winter architectural pla... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Lace Grass

    The natural community type for lace grass (Eragrostis capillaris) are oak barrens and hillside prairies. Hillside prairies are natural grassland communities that occur on moderate to steep exposed slopes, usually found on the crest of hills surrounded by oak forests. These communities nearly alwa... read more
  • Q&A with Lainie Fefferman and Jascha Naverson: Go Behind the Scenes of the Gaits Soundscape

    Celebrate the winter solstice with an immersive soundwalk along the High Line as part of the Gaits Soundscape. Participants become performers as your footsteps are turned into sounds, creating a collective, whimsical music piece including twinkling metallic sounds, electric guitar chords, dulc... read more
  • 6 Reasons to Love the High Line in Winter

    Here are 6 of our top reasons to love winter on the High Line. Anything you would add? 1) Everything is Prettier with Snow Photo by Marcin Wichary As New Yorkers, we often dread snow and everything that comes along with it: questionable slush, forgotten trash pickup, the long frigid w... read more