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Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckEd Ruscha’s High Line Commission Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public art commission in New York City. All photos by Timothy Schenck.
 

Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Jr. Curator & Director of High Line Art talks about legendary artist Ed Ruscha’s first public commission in New York City.

Can you tell us about Ed Ruscha’s commission for the High Line, which opened in early May?
It is the first time that Ed Ruscha is presenting his work in a public space in New York City. The project consists of a large-scale mural painted on the side of an apartment building overlooking the High Line at West 22nd Street. The mural recites “Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today,” and it is a reinterpretation of a 1977 pastel drawing of the same title. The mural is quite large, measuring 30 x 50 feet.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausVisitors take in the moon while sitting on the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, the elevated walkway on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets. If you'd like to observe the heavens through high-powered telescopes, join us for stargazing with the Amateur Astronomers Association. This free event is held in the park each Tuesday evening, weather permitting, from April through October. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line is an urban oasis, with an emphasis on "urban" – even amid the park's tallest trees, one is still very much aware of the city. Once night falls this impression is even greater, as flowers and branches fade into shadow and the lights of New York City shine brightly in the evening sky.

It is thanks to the High Line's innovative lighting system that the evening cityscape is visible from the park. Designed by Hervé Descottes of L’Observatoire International, the energy-efficient LED lighting is installed no higher than waist-level so that pathways are illuminated without creating overhead glare.

L’Observatoire's International was recently named the jury winner of the Architizer A+ Award in the Architecture + Light category for its work on the High Line. In honor of this achievement, we're presenting a collection of images that capture the magic of this innovative design, and have asked Descottes to share his thoughts on them.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Threadleaf bluestar (Amsonia hubrichtii) with American lady butterfly. Photo by Steven Severinghaus An American lady butterfly dines on Amsonia hubrichtii, the threadleaf bluestar, at West 18th Street. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The Northern Spur Preserve from fall, winter, and early spring, to now. Photos by Steven Severinghaus

While winter was a little longer than most of us would have liked, watching the transition of seasons this spring has been a real pleasure.

We loved this series of photos of the Northern Spur Preserve, on the High Line at West 16th Street, that High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus has captured over the seasons. This GIF shows the mesmerizing transformation that takes place from autumn to this moment (full-blown spring!). Watch the snow melt before your eyes, giving way to early spring bulbs and new green growth. If only this year's winter could have gone by as quickly!

Enjoy more lush spring photos in the High Line Flick Pool.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Phil Vachon The captivating pheasant’s eye daffodil, Narcissus poeticus, is the flower that the Greeks saw fit to both honor beauty and condemn vanity. Photo by Phil Vachon

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeThe Chelsea Thicket in bloom. Photo by Stacy Bass

What a difference a week makes!

Warmer temperatures coupled with ample rain have fueled an explosion of new growth and vibrant color this week. Every bud along tree branches has seemed to burst, and delicate new blooms have popped up along the planting beds.

In Stacy Bass's gorgeous shot, which exemplifies the spring season, you can get a glimpse of the variety of plants that are making their first show of the season. The pink blooms of the redbud trees, the soft bottle brush–like flowers of foamflower, and the green of sedges and trees make this stretch of the park one of the most magical. Just north of West 20th Street, the Chelsea Thicket is an area of transition from grasslands to forest. Here you’ll find a mixture of shrubs and trees, and delicate understory grasses and perennials.

Discover all the blooms May has to offer in our monthly bloom list.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Photo by Liz LigonCarolyn Louth and her mother Doris Louth pose near a group of of birch trees they've watched grow from saplings. "The High Line is dear to my heart because of the special moments I share with my daughter there. Together, we can see its seasons bloom and fade," says Doris. Photo by Liz Ligon

Mother-daughter members Doris and Carolyn Louth share a devotion to the High Line that brings them closer despite the 1,300 miles between them. Carolyn, a relatively new New Yorker who has extolled the High Line since efforts began to transform the elevated railway into a public park, has recently joined the Highliners, a group of dedicated supporters whose monthly contributions sustain the High Line year-round. Doris – who resides in Louisiana – received a gift membership from her daughter as a birthday present in 2010 and has renewed her annual membership ever since.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Rowa LeeBlue Bottle Coffee's fennel-parmesan shortbread is a sweet-and-savory treat. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Blue Bottle Coffee might be better known for its, well, awesome coffee, but the High Line Food vendor offers an array of house-made pastries along with its incredible single-origin drip brews and espresso. Stop by their cart at West 15th Street to enjoy treats like vanilla-saffron snickerdoodles, ginger-molasses cookies, and fennel-parmesan shortbread – a sweet-and-savory indulgence that you can also make at home using Blue Bottle's recipe. A printable version is available here.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe male flowers of the bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) grow in long catkins that drape from the branches. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AlterjosThe High Line’s subtle lighting sets the planting beds aglow in this image, which looks south along the Falcone Flyover, at West 26th Street. Photo by Gigi Altarejos
 

Warmer temperatures, rampant blooms, stargazing on Tuesdays, and the return of food – do you need more reasons to visit the High Line after dark?

After the never-ending winter and slow-to-come spring that New York City experienced, it’s obvious that five boroughs of citizens are dying to get outside. Stop by the High Line after work to enjoy some of the best the park has to offer.

Here are a few of the highlights of the High Line after dark:

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