High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line TalksPumpkins, spiders, and spooky skeletons adorn the engine of the High Line Ghost Train, a giant puppet made by local public school students. Photo by Joan Garvin
 
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Later today, we’re joining local elementary school students from Public Schools 3, 11, and 33 for the second annual Halloween Parade on the High Line.

Leading the spooky procession will be the High Line Ghost Train, a giant puppet made by the students over the past month as part of the High Line Teaching Artist Halloween Program, an education initiative sponsored by AT&T.

Follow us after the jump for to learn more and view photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line TalksPlans are in the works to turn New Orleans’ Lafitte Corridor into public open space. Photo by Jackson Hill Photography
 

Leaders and thinkers in Chicago, Detroit, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Atlanta, and other cities are pioneering adaptive reuse projects, and they’re pointing to the High Line as an example of how to make it work.

Some call them copycat projects, but their approach is more nuanced. They are taking inspiration from the unique context and history in their own neighborhoods and finding ways to use it to their advantage as they reinvent and open old infrastructure and out-of-use spaces to the public.

You can find good examples of this type of creative thinking in New Orleans, where designers, grassroots organizations, and civic leaders are joining together to pursue new green adaptive reuse projects that coexist with water.

Follow us after to watch the video and view photos from a talk on the High Line earlier this month about the Crescent City.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Social Soup GridMore than 250 neighbors joined us for a communal meal on the High Line on Saturday, October 22, 2012. Large photo by Scott Lynch. Soup photo by Jenna Saraco. Remaining photos by Sari Goodfriend
 

This special blog post comes to you from Ana Nicole Rodriguez, a High Line neighbor who grew up in West Chelsea and now works as an editorial intern for Food Arts Magazine. We invited Nicole to join us last weekend to document the second annual Social Soup Experiment on the High Line, an event presented by Friends of the High Line as part of High Line Food, a program that brings interesting, sustainable food to the High Line.

What is a park if not a space in which to bring people together?

That community sentiment, along with a focus on seasonality and local food sourcing, is precisely what inspired this year’s Social Soup Experiment. Dining need not exceed the simplicity of wholesome ingredients and smiling faces. A large spoon, two long wooden tables decorated with apples, and a group of more than 250 hungry neighbors is all you need to make the High Line’s “restaurant without walls” possible.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Visitors enjoy Jennifer West's screening of One Mile Film. Photo by Liz Ligon.
 

Last week we debuted Jennifer West’s new feature-length video during a special outdoor screening at the High Line. If you missed the video, you can now view a short clip online. Follow us after the jump to learn more and watch.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Fany Gerson, Chef/Owner of LaNewyorkina, led two sessions of Play With Your Food, creating healthy fruit parfaits and guacamole at an impromptu kitchen at the Seating Steps, on the High Line at West 22nd Street. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Over the course of September, our High Line Food vendors lent their talents to help us teach little ones about healthy eating during Play With Your Food, a free weekly drop-in program. Chefs from People’s Pops, LaNewyorkina, and Terroir participated, working with kids to craft culinary creations using fresh foods.

Join us after the jump for photos from the programs.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Asters are one of the iconic flowers you see at the High Line in the fall. Raydon’s Favorite aromatic aster is a cultivar that produces prolific purple and yellow blooms that shouldn’t be missed. Photo by Patrick Cullina
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Rail Yards Weekends Wrap-Up: main imageA final look at the High Line at the Rail Yards before construction begins. Clockwise from upper right, photos by Beverly Israely, Liz Ligon, Liz Ligon
 

The High Line’s final section is currently closed to visitors, but earlier this month more than 1,600 people explored the final stretch of elevated railway as part of Rail Yards Weekends, a series of self-guided walking tours in celebration of the one-year anniversary of UNIQLO’s Fifth Avenue Global Flagship Store opening, the Japanese clothing retailer’s support of the High Line’s ongoing maintenance and park operations, and the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend.

Follow us after the jump to view visitor photos, watch video, and check out photo essays and press coverage.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Cutleaf Staghorn sumac is just one of several varieties of sumac grown at the High Line. Sumac trees are known for their brilliant fall foliage. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful aerial photo gives a different perspective of the High Line and the surrounding city. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

High Line Photographer Melissa Mansur captured this amazing rainy day aerial photo of the High Line during an openhousenewyork tour at The Standard, New York last weekend.

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