High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
The compass plant is a member of the sunflower family that gets its name from its unique alignment to cardinal directions.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Our gardeners are hard at work this time of year, making sure the park is at its most beautiful. Photo by Beverly Israely.
 

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Summer is an exciting season at the High Line. It marks the return of some of our favorite public programs for all ages, High Line food partners serving up a selection of sweet and savory options along the park, not to mention a diverse and ever-changing palette of flowers and foliage throughout the planting beds.

Join us after the jump for a photographic celebration of the summer season featuring our favorite images from past and present, including many from the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
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We are pleased to welcome the Homeless Museum of Art to the High Line.

The museum, also called HoMu for short, is an performance created by New York-based artist Filip Noterdaeme. Since its inception in 2002, the work has existed in a state of perpetual flux. It has been a live-in museum in a rented apartment; an activist's initiative; an exhibit in a vacant artist studio; a collection of original artworks; and a mock museum booth embedded in a commercial art fair.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Butterfly milkweed is a native of the eastern United States and Canada that’s a favorite among butterflies and other pollinators.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Purple prairie clover’s blooms are popular with both visitors and pollinators. Photo by Beverly Israely.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
EnlargePhoto by Timothy Schenck

The 23rd Street Lawn is a popular gathering space on the High Line, offering open green space for picnicking, sunbathing, and people-watching.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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This season of High Line Food is in full-swing! Follow us after the jump to learn how you can enter to win a complimentary lunch from Terroir at The Porch.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago, Lying Figure, 2012. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

Under The Standard at Little West 12th Street, among the plants and railroad tracks sits Lying Figure, a large-scale sculpture by Los Angeles-based artist Thomas Houseago.

Known for using materials like wood, clay, plaster, steel, and bronze, Houseago creates monumental sculptures that reveal the process of their making through unique details – the varying texture of a molding, the hidden creases within a cast – despite their imposing size and towering forms.

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