High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
This special High Line Live! performance turned the High Line at Little West 13th Street into an open theater at sunset. Photo by Julienne Schaer
 

This week we kicked off High Line Live! – our new program series that brings live theater, performance, and music to the park, thanks to the generous support of MetLife Foundation. More than 150 people joined us on Thursday, June 7 for the Hudson Guild Theater Company debut of their new production, The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line, a contemporary dance adaptation of Tchaikovsky’s classic The Sleeping Beauty. The performance coincided with the first anniversary of the opening of Section 2, making it an extra special occasion to gather with some of our closest neighbors.

Matthew Westerby choreographed the modern dance piece, which featured dancers of all ages and experience levels – many from our own community. The performance was produced by Jim Furlong, Director of Arts at Hudson Guild, a multi-service community center serving those who live, work, or go to school in Chelsea, with a focus on those in need. The Sleeping Beauty is one of many public programs we’ve presented at the High Line in partnership with Hudson Guild.

Join us after the jump to see more photos from The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Young Lady smokebush, Cotinus coggygria 'Young Lady, is a very distinctive plant named for its resemblance to billowing smoke.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two varieties of foxtail lilies are currently blooming at the High Line. Above Eremurus stenophyllus adds bright yellow color to the landscape on the High Line near West 18th Street. Photo by Patrick Cullina.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Like other art on the High Line, Sarah Sze’s sculpture is a temporary installation. Photo by Sarah Sze.
 

This week we bid farewell to Sarah Sze’s Still Life with Path (Model for Habitat), the intricate sculpture flanking the High Line’s pathway at West 21st Street.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 


"Instead of a daily sales goal, I reversed the normal rules of the game and developed a daily rejection goal. If I wasn’t getting rejected, I wasn’t trying hard enough. If I got a lot of rejections, I made my goal… Sometimes rejection can be a good teacher, and sometimes you almost need to seek it out to be freed from it."

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Stop by the High Line tomorrow at sunset to catch the Transit of Venus – an astronomical event in which the planet Venus will pass before the Sun, as seen here in an image from 2004. Photo by NASA.
 

We are keeping our fingers crossed that the rain and clouds will break for tomorrow’s stargazing session on the High Line. If the weather permits, you’ll be able to see a rare astronomical event called the Transit of Venus.

At approximately 6:00 PM, the planet Venus will begin to pass directly between the Sun and the Earth. The last Transit of Venus took place in June of 2004, and projections show it won’t be visible again until the year 2117!

Learn more after the jump.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 

Earlier this morning, a three-block portion of the High Line was temporarily closed to allow emergency responders to investigate a small construction accident at a nearby work site. The NYC Fire Department and NYC Department of Buildings have determined that the High Line sustained no damage and the elevated park itself is structurally sound. The City agencies have cleared the closed portion of the park to reopen to the public.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
L'Arte del Gelato's frozen treats combine a variety of high-quality ingredients including the recent addition of milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery. Photos: top by Lou Manna, courtesy of L'Arte del Gelato; bottom courtesy of Battenkill Valley Creamery.
 

High Line Food is committed to working with entrepreneurial food partners whose products are good for the people eating the food, good for those who grow it, and good for the land. With this core philosophy in mind, we were thrilled when returning food partner L’Arte del Gelato decided to make the switch to locally-sourced milk for their full-range of gelati on offer at the High Line.

This new sustainably-produced New York State milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery is a great addition to their already impressive roster of high quality ingredients.

“Italians know that the secret to good food is to step back and let the ingredients speak for themselves!” L’Arte del Gelato co-founder Francesco Realmuto says. “Using Battenkill Valley Creamery milk for all of our High Line gelati is a great way to showcase delicious local food from right here in New York State.”

Learn more about the family farm supplying L’Arte del Gelato’s milk after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Ronnit Bendavid-Val brings over a decade of experience managing New York City parks to her new position at the High Line
 

The High Line is meant to look like a wild landscape, but it requires an extraordinary amount of work to maintain the plant life and keep the park clean and welcoming for its visitors.

With more than one mile of parkland, mechanical infrastructure, and unique operational challenges, it takes close coordination of a team of dedicated gardeners, custodians, technicians, and more to keep an elevated park like the High Line running smoothly. That’s why we are pleased to welcome Ronnit Bendavid-Val to our staff, as our new Vice President of Horticulture & Park Operations.

Ronnit brings over a decade of experience with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation to her new position of overseeing our team of horticultural and maintenance staff.

Join us after the jump and get to know Ronnit.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Peregrine falcons are just one of the many birds that you may be surprised to see at the High Line. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

The High Line’s plantings are not only beautiful – they provide a year-round oasis for both local and migratory birds. From wooded areas that are good for nesting, to dried seed heads left intact over the winter that offer a source of food during the cold season, the High Line is a natural habitat for urban birds.

In this series of blog posts, we’ll be joined by High Line Gardener and resident naturalist Maryanne Stubbs, for a closer look at the birds you’ll find at the High Line.

Learn more about the High Line’s year-long winged residents after the jump.

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