High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beverly Israely’s photos celebrate the delicate textures and small details of the High Line. Photo by Beverly Israely
 

The High Line is a great place to take photographs. Whether you’re a horticulture enthusiast focusing on blooms, an architecture fan capturing the cityscape, or an art-lover photographing the art on and around the High Line – there’s a little something for everyone. The light, the views, the people, and the unique landscape offer a wide variety of opportunities for amateur and professional photographers alike.

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Beverly Israely is a long-time resident of the West Village and High Line Member, and she was also one of the High Line’s first visitors after it opened as a public park. “I’ve lived here since 1996, and I had heard all about the efforts to save the structure and make it into a park,” Beverly recalls. “Our family came up on a rainy morning in June, not long after the High Line opened, and I was so inspired by how the space had been transformed. Since then, the park has become one of my family’s favorite neighborhood places. You’ll find us here often – walking, picnicking, relaxing on the lounge chairs, and attending performances and kids' events. We are so happy to share this treasure and support Friends of the High Line and the many members of our community who are dedicated to sustaining the High Line as a special place for New Yorkers.”

Join us after a jump for a glimpse at some of Beverly’s favorite parts of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Northern blazing star is in bloom between West 27th and West 30th Streets in the Wildflower Field.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Elad Lassry, Women (065, 055), 2012. Part of HIGH LINE BILLBOARD. Installation view, Edison Properties, West 18th Street at 10th Avenue, New York. On view August 1 – September 7, 2012. Photo: Austin Kennedy. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line..
 

Wednesday morning we braved the rain to install the latest artwork on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD, our High Line Art series of installations on the 25-by-75 foot billboard next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue.

It’s a new work by Los Angeles-based artist Elad Lassry titled Women (065, 055). The work features two young women, both dressed alike, gazing out of two small portholes into a sea of green. Detached from any visual history or context, the image is both mesmerizing and elusive. It highlights the very act of observing and being observed and allows visitors to create their own conceptual space and visual context for the image.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors pause to chat amongst the bright yellow blooms of the High Line’s tall tickseed. Photo by Sarah Tester
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Dancing to the rhythms of Juan Morales and Sonido Costeño during ¡Arriba! Photo by Liz Ligon
 

This summer, you will find some of New York City’s best Latin bands at the High Line. It is all part of ¡Arriba! – our series of free, community dance parties, presented in partnership with HAI and Hudson Guild and supported by MetLife Foundation.

Last week more than 400 people danced to the salsa and merengue rhythms by Juan Morales and Sonido Costeño. We would like to thank everyone for joining us, and congratulate our raffle prize winners, Dennisse and Martin, who went home with our newly-designed High Line tote bags, and Rosa, who picked up a $75 gift certificate to Terroir at The Porch.

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Follow us after the jump to view photos, and get the details for the ¡Arriba! in August, where we’ll be bringing Nu D’Lux to the High Line for an evening of Cuban beats.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
“Decisions, decisions,” Rhesa Storms tweeted to accompany her #shareameal photo submission. Photo by Rhesa Storms.
 

This is the first season that you can enjoy both sweet and savory food offerings at the High Line.

To celebrate the moments made possible by delicious food, great company, and a one-of-a-kind public space, we asked you to share your photos with us on Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #shareameal.

The winner in July was Rhesa Storms, who took an adorable photo of her young friend peering over the edge of Melt Bakery’s cart on the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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We asked you to choose which movie would kick off High Line Teen Picks, our free summer movie series curated by local teens and presented by AT&T.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Young volunteers painting a mural on the side of a commercial building in downtown Detroit. Photo by David Schalliol.
 

Long recognized as one of the country’s most challenged urban centers, Detroit is now undergoing an important renaissance, with new real estate investment, the return of local businesses from the suburbs, and a growing downtown office market. What role does public space play in the city’s revitalization?

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The rail yards section will extend the High Line’s distinct design vocabulary established south of West 30th Street, evoking the High Line’s history as an active freight rail line, and the unique self-seeded landscape that grew between the tracks when the trains stopped running in the 1980s.
 

We have made major advances at the rail yards this summer.

Last week, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Speaker Christine Quinn announced that the City of New York has acquired the High Line at the rail yards from CSX Transportation, Inc., bringing us one step closer toward starting construction. Our next steps are fundraising to pay for transforming the rail yards section into a public park, and collaborating on the design with our City partners and the team of James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf.

Last night we presented the latest design renderings at community input meeting, where more than 200 supporters joined us to share feedback and ask questions.

Follow us after the jump to view some of the new design renderings.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The Neches River mallow is currently a candidate for the US’ Endangered Species List. This beautiful plant only occurs naturally in three wetlands in eastern Texas.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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