High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line Flickr Pool is an great resource for beautiful photographs of the park. One of these images, taken by five contributors to the Flickr Pool, will be selected as the next High Line Print.
 

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, and those New Yorkers stuck in the office a great way to keep track of park life.

This year we are expanding our merchandise program, and among the new offerings will be frame-worthy prints of the High Line. When looking for photographs to be featured as prints, of course we knew where to go.

We’ve selected five of our favorite horticulture images from the Flickr Pool, and we need your help picking one of them to reproduce as a High Line Print.

Follow us after the jump to see the full-size images and vote for your favorite.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The rail yards section will extend the High Line’s distinctive design vocabulary established south of West 30th Street, evoking the High Line’s history as an active freight rail line, and the unique self-seeded landscape that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running in the 1980s.
 

Last night we unveiled the initial design concepts for the rail yards section of the High Line at a community input meeting at Public School 11 in Chelsea.

More than 400 neighbors, supporters, members, and friends turned out to listen to James Corner and Ric Scofidio, of the High Line Design Team, present their concepts, share their feedback, and ask questions.

The never-before-seen images represent the first vision for the High Line’s unique landscape at the rail yards, which is still overgrown with wildflowers and grasses that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running in the 1980s.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the designs.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Volunteers and High Line Gardeners gather tools and supplies at the end of a chilly Spring Cutback shift on Tuesday, March 6. Photo by Liz Ligon.
 

We have just completed week one of High Line Spring Cutback!

Spring Cutback is an intense six week-long process in which we cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers. Stop by the park and see the transformation underway as spring bulbs and new green growth pop up.

Follow us after the jump for an update and photos from our first week.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line Gardeners are busily working to cut back more than 100,000 plants by hand to prepare for new spring growth on the High Line. The process, called High Line Spring Cutback, began this week.
 

This week we begin High Line Spring Cutback – our biggest horticultural task of the year.

Visit the High Line over the next six weeks, and you’ll see High Line Gardeners busily working with teams of volunteers to cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. With each cut they make, you will start to see new green shoots and early spring bulbs emerge.

This morning we invited volunteers, supporters, and local teens from the NYC Lab School for Collaborative Studies to take part in a ceremonial cutting to mark the launch. Follow us after the jump to learn more and view photos.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Jet Trail flowering quince is known for its abundant white blooms that cover the shrub in early spring. Photo by High Line Volunteer Lebasi Lashley.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardener John Gunderson advises Spring Cutback volunteers on the proper technique for cutting back the grasses during a volunteer orientation session on February 15.
 

In just a few days, we will begin what has become one of our favorite traditions since the High Line opened as a public park. Spring Cutback – it’s a six-week operation that involves hundreds of hours of hard work to trim back the park’s 100,000 plants to make way for the new growing season.

Spring Cutback is the biggest horticultural undertaking of the year – one that took us more than 1,200 hours to complete last year. With the recent opening of the new section of the High Line, this will be the first spring where we have one mile of parkland to prepare for spring. We can’t do it alone, so we have recruited more than 300 members, supporters, neighbors, and friends from our community to help us complete this monumental task.

The volunteers recently completed their orientation session, where they were introduced to the unique challenges of maintaining a park in the sky. Follow us after the jump for a recap.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Work is progressing at the site of the future High Line Headquarters. In the foreground, the formwork for the pile caps and grade beam are outlined in plywood. Crews will pour concrete into these forms; once the concrete dries, the plywood will be removed. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Stand on the High Line near its southern end, and look to the west toward the Hudson River. You will see a giant construction site covered with steel beams, plywood, backhoes, and other heavy duty equipment. It is all part of the ongoing work to build the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and photos.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Corsican hellebore is a hearty evergreen that produces pale green flowers in late winter.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The High Line, looking south from West 23rd Street. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

In case you missed it, last month Travel + Leisure named the High Line as No. 10 on its list of the world’s most popular landmarks.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Family Feather Flurry brought together nearly 40 children and their caregivers for a winter scavenger hunt on the High Line, followed by crafts and storytelling at Posman Books.
 

On Sunday, February 5, children and caregivers joined us for the Family Feather Flurry, a High Line Kids scavenger hunt that explored the High Line’s winter landscape from a bird’s perspective. Following clues about the High Line’s unique plants and flowers, families made their way toward West 16th Street. From there everyone headed to the program’s next stop, Posman Books in Chelsea Market, to decorate their bird puppets and listen to stories.

Enjoy photos from the event and download the High Line scavenger hunt for your kids after the jump.

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