High Line Blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
The woodland crocus is one of the first spring bulbs to pop up. Keep an eye out for these tiny purple flowers. Photo by Cristina Macaya.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Celluloid Strip

Happy Valentine’s Day from Friends of the High Line!

In honor of the romantic holiday, here’s a celluloid strip of lipstick kisses from Jennifer West’s silent film currently looping on HIGH LINE CHANNEL.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
We need your help cutting back the High Line's plants to make way for new spring growth. Submit your volunteer application by Monday, February 13. Photo (upper right) by Joan Garvin. Other photos by Friends of the High Line.
 

The first signs of spring are already popping up along the High Line. To make way for new growth, we are now turning our attention to the biggest horticultural undertaking of the year: High Line Green-Up Spring Cutback.

Beginning in March, the High Line Gardeners will be working quickly to sheer back the grasses and perennials by hand, using pruners, scissors, and the help of volunteers and staff.

Spring Cutback is a monumental task – one that took us 1,200 hours to complete last year. This year, we have twice as much work to do. The High Line doubled in length when the new section opened last June, giving us one mile of parkland with more than 100,000 plants to prepare for spring this year.

We can’t do it without the help of volunteers like you. We hope you will join us!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pussy willows are named for their soft cat fur-like blooms that herald spring.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A rendering imagines how the abandoned Jersey City railway could be converted into public space. Image by Roman Pohorecki.
 

Community members in Jersey City are celebrating a step forward toward the preservation of an elevated freight way similar to the High Line. Last Friday, a Federal appeals court ruled that the city and several nonprofit groups do indeed have standing to pursue their contention that Conrail prematurely sold the property for development before obtaining required rail abandonment permission. Federal rail abandonment law provides historic and environmental protections for the public, as well as opportunities for the City to purchase the property at a reasonable price. The decision paves the way for converting the Embankment into public space.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pallida witch hazel produces vibrant yellow flowers early in the year. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
An illustration by designer and author Vahram Muratyan comparing the Promenade Plantée, or Coulée Verte, and the High Line. The illustration is part of his new book, Paris vs. New York: A Tally of Two Cities. Image courtesy of the author and Penguin Books.
 

Paris and New York — two cultural centers an ocean apart have a friendly rivalry that’s older than time. Whether you prefer shopping the Champs Elysées or 5th Avenue, spending a rainy day reading Le Temps Retrouvé or The Catcher in the Rye, or snacking on a macaron or a cupcake — you will appreciate designer Vahram Muratyan’s witty side-by-sides of these two iconic cities.

Vahram’s comparisons of Paris and New York, and the Promenade Plantée and the High Line, give us yet another reason to celebrate the Parisian park for its inspiration. Here we take a closer look of at the High Line’s predecessor.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
joan garvin

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hyemi Cho’s portraits peek out of the windows of neighboring apartment buildings and playfully engage High Line visitors. Photo by Meg Kinney.
 

High Line visitors are often surprised to see smiling faces gazing back at them, and even waving, from the windows of neighboring buildings toward the northern terminus of the park. After the initial double-take, it’s easy to realize that these amusing locals are not flesh-and-blood people, but rather a playful ruse.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This particular cultivar of witch hazel blooms in the winter when most other plants are dormant.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

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