High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The southern terminus of the High Line overlooks the construction site for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters.The southern terminus of the High Line overlooks the construction site for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters.
 

Near the High Line’s southern terminus, crews are hard at work preparing to pour the foundations for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters, which will provide critical support to the maintenance and operations of the High Line.

Follow us after the jump to watch a preview video of the museum, view photos of the construction, and learn more about the new High Line Headquarters.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Friends of the High Line staff take a tour of the Reading Viaduct with members of the non-profit group dedicated to creating a public park in the space, Viaduct Greene. Photo by Rick Darke.Friends of the High Line staff take a tour of the Reading Viaduct with members of the non-profit group dedicated to creating a public park in the space, Viaduct Greene. Photo by Rick Darke.
 

New York City is not the only urban center in the United States with an elevated railway like the High Line.

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In Philadelphia, an old freight and passenger rail line called the Reading Viaduct winds above the streets and between buildings just north of the city’s center. Just like the High Line, the trains stopped running decades ago, and since then nature has taken over the tracks. The self-seeded landscape has inspired some local residents to join together to advocate for the historic structure to be transformed into public open space.

We took a field trip to Philadelphia on October 20 to walk the line, observe the wild landscape, and share ideas with Paul vanMeter and Liz Maillie of Viaduct Greene, the non-profit dedicated to creating a new public park on the structure. Follow us after the jump for photos and more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Emily and KidsBefore it was transformed into a public park, the High Line carried freight trains to and from the warehouses and factories along Manhattan’s West Side. Today, the High Line serves as a tool to teach kids about the city’s industrial history.
 

Halloween Hi-Jinks on the High Line is one of several educational initiatives to strengthen our partnerships with the neighborhood public schools, and teach kids about the High Line through fun, interactive, hands-on activities.

WATCH VIDEO: New York City News Service covered the event. Check out their news video.

We would like to thank the following organizations for supporting our partnerships with local public schools: the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, with additional support from the Altman Foundation; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; The Concordia Foundation; The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation; and, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Follow us after the jump for a photo tour of the project.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


Ever find yourself on the phone or writing an email trying to explain a specific spot or vantage point on the High Line?

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.

And that is why your life just got a lot easier thanks to Google Street View, which now features the High Line, allowing you to plan your visit, take a virtual stroll, and explore the park in a whole new way.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Colicchio and SonsHigh Line supporters enjoyed a walk-around tasting dinner featuring acclaimed chefs from the neighborhood. Photo by Patrick McMullan.
 

We would like to extend a special thank you to Tom Colicchio, Chef/Owner of Colicchio & Sons, and the talented chefs from the restaurants along the High Line who participated in this year's High Line Chefs Dinner.

The High Line Chefs Dinner is an annual special event that helps raise crucial funding to support the ongoing maintenance and operations of the High Line. This year's event took place on Sunday, October 23. The evening began on the High Line, where guests enjoyed sunset cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. The festivities then moved off the High Line to Colicchio & Sons, where more than 250 guests enjoyed cocktails and innovative small plates during a walk-around dinner.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


Designers, architects, engineers, and planning nerds like us will appreciate A.O. Scott’s review of Gary Hustwit’s new film, Urbanized in today’s New York Times.

“Like a really good class taught by a team of enthusiastic professors, Urbanized supplies grist for many late-night arguments or solitary ruminations. It is worth venturing out of your room, climbing on your bike or boarding a low-emissions bus and fighting your way through a crowd to see.”

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

It is the question we are asked most often by visitors on the High Line: what is happening with the final section of the High Line just beyond the construction fence at West 30th Street?

Representing one-half mile of the entire historic freight rail structure, the High Line at the West Side Rail Yards wraps around an incredibly complicated development site. It has working rail yard filled with LIRR trains, plans for the city’s largest real estate project in decades, and multiple stakeholders from the public and private sectors, all of whom have unique needs.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A Social Soup ExperimentGuests gather at a communal table at Friends of the High Line's Social Soup Experiment, Saturday, October 22
 

What happens when hundreds of people gather for a one-pot meal at a communal table in a restaurant without walls placed on the High Line?

Why, they eat of course!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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Grass clippings, tree trimmings, banana peels, and coffee grounds might sound like things you’d throw in the trash, but here at the High Line, these are all raw ingredients for “black gold,” better known as compost.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
seedheadsThe seed heads of the wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace') on the High Line.
 
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The High Line is full of signs that fall has arrived in New York City. There is a chill in the air, and picnics on the 23rd Street Lawn and the sights and sounds of children splashing in the water feature on the Diller-Von Furstenberg Sundeck have given way to quiet strolls through the park.

When you visit the High Line in the next few weeks, you can spot the gardeners tending to the milkweed pods in the planting beds, and the maintenance staff preparing for a busy schedule of fall programming. When you stroll through the Chelsea Grasslands, you smell the sweet scent of the Prairie Dropseed, or you might catch a blooming Solidago nestled in a bundle of autumn leaves. Visitors to the Chelsea Market Passage can try new menu items from from High Line Food vendors, such as hot chocolate from Blue Bottle Coffee or grilled cheese sandwiches at The Porch.

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