High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
julietFriends of the High Line offers free public programs for kids and families on the High Line, offering a chance to learn about the park's history, design, plants, and art through creative play and nature-based education. Juliet Schraeder joined Friends of the High Line for the summer of 2011 as the High Line Family & Public Programs Graduate Summer Intern. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

This special guest blog post comes to you from Juliet Schraeder, who is completing a summer internship at Friends of the High Line as part of her graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin. All summer long, Juliet has played a strategic role in leading our family and youth public programs on the High Line.

Author: 
Salmaan Khan
EnlargeA West Side Cowboy.

Friends of the High Line supporter Flo Muller was kind enough to point out a fascinating description of the days before the High Line, filled with cowboys and trains on the streets of Manhattan, in Mario Puzo’s book The Fortunate Pilgrim;

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 
EnlargeLauren Ross.

Last week, we bid farewell to Lauren Ross, our Donald R. Mullen, Jr. Curator & Director of Arts Programs. When Lauren first came to us in 2009, we were in the final stages of construction on the first section of the High Line, and Creative Time was helping us install our first public art installation: A River That Flows Both Ways by Spencer Finch.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Trisha Brown Dance Company performs Roof Piece for the High LineTrisha Brown Dance Company recreates Roof Piece, originally performed in SoHo in 1971. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Despite heavy winds and ominous clouds on the horizon, nine dancers from the Trisha Brown Dance Company stepped into place on rooftops along the southern terminus of the High Line on Thursday evening. The dancers were preparing for their 7:00 PM performance — the debut of Roof Piece — a dance originally performed by the company in SoHo in 1971, and recreated on its 40th anniversary for the High Line. As the dancers prepared to begin, park visitors gathered along the High Line between Gansevoort and West 14th Streets. Some had come to see the performance, and others had stumbled upon it.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist

Construction crews are busy installing plants and building the elevators, stairs, and design features in preparation for Section 2 to open next month. When we are ready to announce the opening date, we will share it with you here.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Worker PlantingCrews recently installed more than 8,000 plants in the beds under the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, a dense woodland area in Section 2. Here, a crew member plants Densiflora lilyturf (Liriope muscari 'Densiflora'), an evergreen groundcover. Photo by Tim Schneck
 

Now that the weather has warmed up and the soil has thawed, landscape crews are back at work, installing perennials and grasses in the planting beds throughout Section 2.

Follow us after the jump for more photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


Enlarge

High Line Green-Up takes place once a year at the start of the growing season. This year, more than 100 volunteers from the greater High Line community dedicated their time and energy to help our gardeners complete this tremendous task. High Line Green-Up began on March 1, and thanks to their hard work and dedication, we completed the job in just under a month.

Follow us after the jump for video, photos, and more.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Crocus blooms on the High LineTommasini's crocus (Crocus tommassinianus), one of the first bulbs to bloom this season. Find them on the High Line in the Washington Grasslands and Chelsea Grasslands. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Spring is one of the most special and vibrant times on the High Line. Each time you visit during the coming months, you'll discover changes in the landscape—new shoots of green among the gravel ballast, leaves spreading out along tree branches, and a continuing kaleidoscope of florals.

Follow us beyond the jump for some of our upcoming favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
viewing-platform-arrives
 

At the northern terminus of Section 2, construction crews recently hoisted a 15-by-35-foot steel frame into place. The frame is a key component of the Viewing Platform above the 30th Street Cut-Out, an area where the High Line’s concrete decking has been removed, revealing the steel gridwork of High Line beams and girders. The 30th Street Cut-Out will be one of the unique design features visitors find when Section 2 opens later this spring. 30th Street Cut-Out, thanks to The Pershing Square Foundation.

Follow us after the jump for more photos and renderings.

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