High Line Blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeThe Chelsea Thicket in bloom. Photo by Stacy Bass

What a difference a week makes!

Warmer temperatures coupled with ample rain have fueled an explosion of new growth and vibrant color this week. Every bud along tree branches has seemed to burst, and delicate new blooms have popped up along the planting beds.

In Stacy Bass's gorgeous shot, which exemplifies the spring season, you can get a glimpse of the variety of plants that are making their first show of the season. The pink blooms of the redbud trees, the soft bottle brush–like flowers of foamflower, and the green of sedges and trees make this stretch of the park one of the most magical. Just north of West 20th Street, the Chelsea Thicket is an area of transition from grasslands to forest. Here you’ll find a mixture of shrubs and trees, and delicate understory grasses and perennials.

Discover all the blooms May has to offer in our monthly bloom list.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Photo by Liz LigonCarolyn Louth and her mother Doris Louth pose near a group of of birch trees they've watched grow from saplings. "The High Line is dear to my heart because of the special moments I share with my daughter there. Together, we can see its seasons bloom and fade," says Doris. Photo by Liz Ligon

Mother-daughter members Doris and Carolyn Louth share a devotion to the High Line that brings them closer despite the 1,300 miles between them. Carolyn, a relatively new New Yorker who has extolled the High Line since efforts began to transform the elevated railway into a public park, has recently joined the Highliners, a group of dedicated supporters whose monthly contributions sustain the High Line year-round. Doris – who resides in Louisiana – received a gift membership from her daughter as a birthday present in 2010 and has renewed her annual membership ever since.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Rowa LeeBlue Bottle Coffee's fennel-parmesan shortbread is a sweet-and-savory treat. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Blue Bottle Coffee might be better known for its, well, awesome coffee, but the High Line Food vendor offers an array of house-made pastries along with its incredible single-origin drip brews and espresso. Stop by their cart at West 15th Street to enjoy treats like vanilla-saffron snickerdoodles, ginger-molasses cookies, and fennel-parmesan shortbread – a sweet-and-savory indulgence that you can also make at home using Blue Bottle's recipe. A printable version is available here.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe male flowers of the bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) grow in long catkins that drape from the branches. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AlterjosThe High Line’s subtle lighting sets the planting beds aglow in this image, which looks south along the Falcone Flyover, at West 26th Street. Photo by Gigi Altarejos
 

Warmer temperatures, rampant blooms, stargazing on Tuesdays, and the return of food – do you need more reasons to visit the High Line after dark?

After the never-ending winter and slow-to-come spring that New York City experienced, it’s obvious that five boroughs of citizens are dying to get outside. Stop by the High Line after work to enjoy some of the best the park has to offer.

Here are a few of the highlights of the High Line after dark:

    Author: 
    Kyla Dippong
    Categories: 
    Photo by Beverly IsraelyYou can find pretty Tulipa saxatilis ‘Lilac Wonder’ blooming at West 14th Street. Photo by Beverly Israely
     

    Excuse me, what’s that flower? We hear this question every day at this time of year. You may not recognize it. It’s your old friend the tulip.

    These are species tulips, which look very different than their larger Dutch cousins, the hybridized garden tulips. They are smaller by one-third to one-half, and their foliage is often finer. Also referred to as botanical tulips or wild tulips, they are less susceptible to pests and diseases. Your fancy tulip cultivars may provide flash but are short-lived. You will generally have to replant annually. Species tulips, on the other hand, are true perennials – they return every year, and many will naturalize.

    Author: 
    Andi Pettis
    Photo by Phil VachonSassafras albidum's clusters of chartreuse flowers add bright color along the High Line. Photo by Phil Vachon

    The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

    This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

    Author: 
    Erika Harvey
    Photo by John SuharIn the evening hours and on overcast days, Lady Jane tulips, Tulipa Lady Jane, are closed. On warm sunny days the pink petals open to reveal bright white interiors and black anthers. Photo by John Suhar

    Yesterday evening, High Line Photographers gathered for the first time in 2014. Pausing briefly to observe beautiful blooms and catch up with old (and new) friends, we worked our way through the park documenting the season. This stunning photo of a “sleeping” Lady Jane tulip by John Suhar epitomizes the nascent magic of spring, which can often go unnoticed. All around the park – and the city – green growth is finally filling in what was once bare soil and tree branches are bursting with new blooms.

    Lady Jane tulips, Tulipa Lady Jane, are one of our most iconic spring blooms. Their arrival was a little delayed by cold weather, but now that they’re here, they won’t disappoint. Stop by on a sunny day in the next couple of weeks to see them in full glory.

    Author: 
    Andi Pettis
    Photo by Steven SeveringhausCinnamon-colored tassels edge the fronds of the Korean tassel fern as they first begin to unfurl in the spring. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

    The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

    This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

    Author: 
    Erika Harvey
    Photo by Timothy SchenckJessica Jackson Hutchins’ sculpture Him and Me is turning heads on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 26th Streets. Photo by Timothy Schenck

    High Line Art’s third group exhibition kicked off this week with the installation of eight artworks by seven national and international artists. Titled Archeo, this exhibition explores humanity’s alternating fascination and frustration with technology. From the rusty industrial (reminiscent of the once-derelict High Line) Common Crossings by Marianne Vitale to the hauntingly contemporary and semi-familiar Skittles by Josh Kline, each work transforms the ordinary visitor into an archeologist, uncovering human-made “artifacts” of post-industrial society.

    This week’s Photo of the Week by photographer Timothy Schenck captures Jessica Jackson Hutchins’ organic and personal-feeling artwork, lovingly entitled Him and Me. This ceramic sculpture takes respite in a hand-woven hammock beneath the High Line’s Falcone Flyover, between West 25th and West 27th Streets.

    Learn more about all of the artworks of Archeo.

    Pages