High Line Blog

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Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
Winter grasses on the High LineGrasses on the High Line show a multitude of colors during the colder seasons. Photo by Rich Nacin.
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe Seating Steps and Lawn will be a central gathering spot when Section 2 opens in the spring.
 

Crews have finished rolling out the sod on what will be the High Line's first lawn—a 4,900 square foot swath of inviting turf in Section 2.

The Lawn is located between West 22nd and West 23rd Streets, where the High Line opens up to a wider area that once housed an extra track that served a loading deck for the adjacent warehouse.

In recent weeks, the High Line's contractors have installed sod in this central gathering spot. The sod is comprised of a mix of varied grasses that is more tolerant of heavy use, foot traffic, heat, and shade than a typical lawn.

When Section 2 opens in the spring, visitors will find that the Lawn "peels-up" at the northern end, offering an elevated vantage point from which to view the city skyline to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
High Line landscapeA photograph from My High Line, Joan Garvin's new book that captures the High Line's first year.
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Ryan Francis Video

UPDATE: Now you can listen to an excerpt of Francis' High Line online. Click here to listen.

If you had to describe the High Line with music, how would it sound?

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeCarol Levitt's second grade class at the Village Community School used the High Line to study a number of topics this past spring. One element was this structure, which the class constructed as a model of the structure in its current use as a public park.
 

The High Line is more than place for strolling and enjoying city views—the park's gardens, design, and history are excellent tools for teaching people of all ages. This is especially true for Carol Levitt, a 2nd grade teacher at the Village Community School in the West Village.

Carol saw the High Line as a means of teaching her students about the life-cycle of plants, our city's industrial history, and the importance of community participation. After bringing her students on fields trips with Emily Pinkowitz, our School & Youth Program Manager, Carol's students asked to build a giant model of the High Line in their classroom. Using building blocks, cardboard, construction paper, aluminum foil, plastic, and other found materials, they created a model that takes a look at what the High Line once was, and what it is today.

The students' careful attention to detail shines through in their final result. The model included architectural design features, like the 10th Avenue Square, and prominent neighborhood landmarks near the park, like The Standard Hotel and Pastis. It even featured a garden that used live plants, pebbles, and popsicle-stick railroad tracks to recreate the way the High Line looked when the trains stopped running.

"The children in my group feel as if the High Line somehow belongs to them," Carol says, "They joyfully take their parents, grandparents, and friends of all ages to the High Line and tell them the story. The children followed the approval of the Rail Yards with cheers. How extraordinary that they studied the High Line as it grew and will continue to grow. They see themselves as being the future of the High Line—which they will indeed be."

The photos tell the full story. Follow us after the jump for a tour of their project.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe Viewing Spur's painted steel frame has arrived. Next, crews will install the glass guardrail, viewing platform, and wood benches.
 

If you are walking near 10th Avenue and West 26th Street, look up and you will notice a new addition to the High Line. The Viewing Spur is starting to take shape.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeFrancis Cape's The Other End of the Line will be on view under the High Line on the Gansevoort Plaza at Gansevoort and Washington Streets. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

If you have visited the High Line this week, you may have noticed a peculiar new addition: there's a mobile home parked on Gansevoort Plaza, under the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets.

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