High Line Blog

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Anonymous
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Don't miss the Target High Line Street Festival, our free celebration of the High Line's opening season, taking place this Sunday and generously sponsored by Target.

From 12:00 Noon to 5:00 PM, we'll take over Gansevoort Street between Ninth Avenue and Washington Street, in the Meatpacking District.

Come marvel at the World's Largest Lemonade Stand – in a 1,300 gallon custom-built Rosenwach water tank. The event will also feature inflatable sculptures, a reincarnation of the West Side Cowboy from the Federation of Black Cowboys, body painting, and performances by the Hungry March Band, Zona Del Barrio, and Michael Arenella and his Dreamland Orchestra, among many others.

Author: 
Sanaya Kaufman
EnlargeCharles Nolan High Line tote

A new piece of High Line Merchandise, this fantastic canvas and leather High Line logo tote by Charles Nolan, located in the neighborhood at 30 Gansevoort Street.

Author: 
Anonymous
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Night on the High LineImage Courtesy of Katie Sokoler.
 

Katie Sokoler over at Gothamist took some amazing night shots of the High Line a few weeks ago. Though the Line makes for a great stroll or hangout during the day, it becomes an altogether different experience by night. For those of you who haven't checked it out after dark yet, these pictures are worth a look.

Also be sure to check out the ever-evolving, ever-amazing High Line flickr pool to see more photos and to add your own.

More images after the break

Author: 
Anonymous
People in the parkImage courtesy of Claudia Berger.
 

A recent article in the Gotham Gazette documents the perks of a good park, far beyond its immediate function as a facility for recreation and rest. According to "The Central Park Effect", Central Park attracts more than 25 million visitors a year, about one fifth of whom come from outside the city. Spending by these visitors directly and indirectly accounted for $395 million in economic activity. This activity, as well as increases in property values near the park, generated $656 million in revenues for the city in 2007.

In its first week, the High Line attracted more than 70,000 visitors. According to the New York Times, City officials have predicted that development sparked by the High Line as a public park will bring $4 billion in private investment and $900 million in revenues to the city over the next 30 years.

Author: 
Michelle Sharkey
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Today's blog post was guest written by one of our Greeters, Claudia Berger.

One thing is for sure, rain certainly helps the garden grow. The last few weeks of rain has really allowed the Chelsea Grasslands section to flourish. Flowers and other plants of all colors, shapes and sizes have been blooming attracting not only visitors but a variety of butterflies, bees, and birds.

Author: 
elizahh
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If you visited the park in our first couple of weeks, you may have been told to enter using the Gansevoort access point. This early limited access was part of our strategy to handle the anticipated heavy crowds on the park initially.

You can now enter and exit the park at all access points (Gansevoort stairs, 14th Street stairs, 16th street stairs and elevator, 18th street stairs, and 20th street stairs).

Author: 
Anonymous
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[brightcove vid=25167691001&exp3=9305148001&surl=http://c.brightcove.com/services&pubid=1336820319&w=450&h=350]

Here's a video from UK-based Wallpaper, featuring Co-Founder Joshua David and lead designer James Corner. It was shot back in April, a couple months before the park opened, and it's amazing how different the landscape looks.

Author: 
Anonymous
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Enlarge

We've created a brand-new Flickr Group, and it's looking a little lonely. We need YOU to cheer up our Pool by adding photos of your High Line visit!

Author: 
Anonymous
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Some of you may have noticed an increase in precipitation over the past month or so. Meteorologists have put it down to the high-altitude jet stream that normally guides the movement of weather across the country being slightly south of its normal position- an explanation that may suffice for those of us willing to settle for a simple, evidently logical answer, but for those looking for a more challenging account of what's going on, the folks over at trainjotting have uncovered a much more sinister explanation.

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