High Line Blog

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Anonymous
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Today brought one of the strangest views from the High Line yet: A few of us were up on the site this afternoon to see how it was faring in the frigid weather, when we caught a chilling glimpse of the US Airways plane that crashed into the icy Hudson today. (Amazingly, even in the sub-freezing temperatures, there are no fatalities reported.)

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Anonymous
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Photo by Barry Munger.
Friends of the High Line's Deputy Director of Horticulture talks about planting on the High Line, working with Field Operations and Planting Designer Piet Oudolf, and creating a maintenance plan for the new landscape.

Where were you before coming to Friends of the High Line, and what drew you to the High Line project?

I was at the Horticultural Society of New York as the director of a community horticulture program called GreenBranches.  We worked with the community, transitional work crews, and local designers to install, maintain, and program public gardens in underserved neighborhoods around the city.
I was drawn to the High Line as one of the most intriguing projects in urban gardening I could ever imagine. 

What was unique about the landscape that grew on the High Line after the trains stopped running?

It's a fascinating example of how plants just work themselves out.  A diverse mix of grasses, asters, mosses, shrubby colonizers and weed trees gradually took hold in mere inches of railroad ballast mixed with decomposing dust and soil.  Seeds and pollen were deposited on the Line by the train cars that once ran along it, and by birds, wind, and the occasional trespasser.   The plant species that were most adaptable to harsh weather, urban pollution, and total neglect grew into the beautifully-wild space that was the found High Line landscape, as the world went on unknowingly just below.
Author: 
Patrick Hazari
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Friends of the High Line's office recently got a new addition: a 9 foot-by-18 foot aerial High Line wall map in our reception area. The map shows the High Line's design in context: the entire line is visible as it moves north from the West Village, through Chelsea, to the West Side Rail Yards.

The unusual view from above reveals the complex relationship between the High Line and its neighborhood. You can see the surrounding built environment as a series of blocks, streets, and related and unrelated structures, seemingly stitched together by the common thread of the High Line. You can see where the line literally passes through buildings, which familiar neighborhood landmarks it nears and touches, and how it parallels the Hudson River. Here at our office, we can't stop looking at it.

Download your own version of this map for your desktop!

Click the size you would like to download:

Small monitor: 800 x 600 pixels
Medium-size monitor: 1024 x 768 pixels
Large-size monitor: 1280 1024 pixels
Wide-screen monitor: 1680 x 1050 pixels

 

Instructions for downloading the wallpaper after the jump!


Author: 
Danya Sherman
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2008 was a great year for the High Line. Without a completed park to play on, we've had the opportunity to get very creative with our programs--trips to Governor's Island, canoeing on the Bronx River, chalking paths to the High Line's future entrances, and more. The opening of the first section (Gansevoort Street--20th Street) is rapidly approaching and we are in the midst of planning some very exciting programs for the occasion-- for the first time, we will be able to bring the public onto the finished park.  

Here's a look at some of our events from the past year.


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Middle-school students from Chelsea's Lab School for Collaborative Studies wore special "Chalk Shoes" that they designed and cast, with the help of artist Julia Mandle. The Chalk Shoes performance was a collaborative performance art piece, using the shoes to draw lines along the sidewalks of Chelsea, leading the way to the High Line's future access points.


sketching class
 

High Line supporters sketch on the High Line rail yards' section, as part of last spring's High Line Sketching Classes with artist Ann DeVere.

More after the jump...


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Anonymous
worksman tricycleWorksman Tricycle

M&O is a new series of posts attempting to explain some of the  Maintenance and Operations issues we're thinking about for the High Line once it's open. M&O discussions are ongoing, and many details will be finalized in the months leading up to the High Line's opening.

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Anonymous
constructionThe planting team hard at work on Section 1, getting perennials into the ground last fall.
Photo by Barry Munger.
 
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Anonymous
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News
It's been a great year for the High Line in the news. In no particular order, here are some highlights:

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Anonymous
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That time of year is upon us (winter, that is)-- and much more officially so, now that we've received our first significant snowfall of the season-- and the High Line, mythical as it might seem, is no less affected than the rest of New York City by a fresh blanket of everyone's favorite type of precipitation. Many of New York's most famous street scenes and landmarks are transformed by snow, making them symbols of New York City in winter. Judging by the effect of last Friday's snow on the High Line, we're eager to see the High Line join the likes of Central Park, Radio City Music Hall and the Empire State Building in the ranks of New York City landmarks that are altered spectacularly in the winter to become memorable and historic parts of the New York City landscape.

More pictures after the break.

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