High Line Blog

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Author: 
Mark Hoopes
Photo by Friends of the High LineEven without its bright orange flowers, the butterfly milkweed is a beautiful plant.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Categories: 
Photo by Liz LigonOur new Executive Director, Jenny Gersten, grew up minutes from the High Line – her childhood apartment building is visible in the background of this picture. Photo by Liz Ligon

Although it's been only a few weeks since Jenny Gersten joined Friends of the High Line as our new Executive Director, we feel like this dynamic New York City native is already part of the family.

Jenny grew up in Greenwich Village, just minutes from the structure we now know as the High Line. But the High Line of her childhood was not yet a park in the sky with kids programs, blooming flowers, and mouthwatering ice-cream sandwiches. We sat down with the former Artistic Director of the Williamstown Theatre to learn more about her vision for our growing organization.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AltarejosDried grasses, bare branches, and a light blanket of snow epitomize winter beauty in the High Line’s gardens. Photo by Gigi Altarejos

It may only be the end of January, but many New Yorkers are already looking for signs that the icy grip of winter is loosening. While some in the nation will be celebrating the beginning of Chinese New Year and rooting for their favorite teams, others of us will be watching attentively as Punxsutawney Phil, the country’s most famous weather-prognosticating groundhog, makes his prediction about the coming of spring.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Steven SeveringhausA mockingbird enjoys the "berries" – actually cones – of one of the High Line's Emerald Sentinel® Eastern red cedar trees. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Mike TschappatHigh Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured an interesting view of the High Line with visitors and Chelsea Piers in the background, silhouetted against a warm end-of-the-day sky.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineAfter a January snowstorm, the leaves of Green Shadow sweetbay magnolia remain vibrant. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckOur newest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood, photographed by Timothy Schenck

High Line Photographer Timothy Schenck perfectly captured our latest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood in an aerial image, allowing us to see how this monumental work of art appears at a distance. The lofty viewpoint showcases the scale of the billboard in relation to the High Line, as well as how the work's bright colors interact with the muted shades of the winter landscape. Schenck has taken photographs of High Line Art's projects for years, and his documentation of the program's sculptures, billboards, and other works of art allows us to appreciate them in a whole new way.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe elegant gray birch can be found growing throughout the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe staghorn sumac, Rhus typhina, is particularly striking during the colder months. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

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