High Line Blog

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Author: 
Patrick Hazari

In some ways, Chelsea in 1986 in not so different from what it is today. Sure, the neighborhood has changed and evolved in many ways, but it has also remained a diverse community of people, activities, and uses. The preservation and reuse of High Line adds another interesting element to the rich history of Chelsea and when Section 1 of the High Line opens later this year, the neighborhood will evolve yet again. Photos courtesy Department of City Planning.

Author: 
Anonymous
Enlargehoney
  This 4-inch praying mantis was spotted on the Rail Yards section, above 30th Street.
Author: 
matthewatthehighline

For the very first time that we are aware of, the High Line was featured in a New York Times Editorial. In it, America's paper of record challenges the City and Tishman Speyer to seize the opportunity provided by the development rights to the West Side Rail Yards and to do the right thing and "preserve all of the High Line, the 1.5-mile stretch of elevated railway that is being transformed into a green jewel of public space."

There was considerable pride and a few tears as we read this unprecedented shout-out by the Times.

Read the editorial  on the Times site, or after the jump.


Author: 
joshatthehighline
Categories: 

The handsomest factories and warehouses around the High Line got a kiss from the city on March 18, when the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) calendered a proposal for a new industrial historic district in West Chelsea.  When the LPC calendars a proposal, it has a high chance of being approved.  The hearing is scheduled for May 13.  Read the LPC's statement about the district after the jump.

EnlargeCourtesy NYC Landmarks
Preservation Commission.

There are many people and groups who've helped make this happen, most notably New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who provided crucial leadership on this initiative, as she has done on so many other important projects in our neighborhood (including the High Line!).  State Senator Tom Duane also championed the effort, as did the Society of the Architecture of the City.  That said, the historic district was originally the brainchild of a longtime Chelsea resident and Community Board 4 member, Ed Kirkland.  Ed has been pushing for this historic district for years -- it's one of many ways this dedicated preservationist and tireless community activist has worked to ensure that the most valuable historic resources of our community are maintained.

We're excited about this district, because it joins the High Line's preservation in demonstrating the importance of preserving industrial architecture and infrastructure.  Some of the buildings in the district are among our favorites in the High Line neighborhood, including the Starrett-Lehigh Building, the New York Terminal Warehouse Company's Central Stores, and many others.

west chelseaThe Otis Elevator Building, built in 1911-1912, is one of the buildings in the proposed West Chelsea Historic District.
Photo courtesy NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission.
 

Other buildings in the proposed district include: the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Freight Warehouse; the RC Williams Warehouse; the Cornell Iron Works, and the Reynolds Metal Company.

Read the LPC's statement about the district after the jump.

Author: 
Anonymous
 

The MTA announced today that it has selected Tishman Speyer as the developer for the West Side Rail Yards. This announcement ends a 6-month bidding process, which originally involved 5 competing developers. Tishman Speyer outbid the only other remaining contender-- a joint venture between the Durst Organization and Vornado Realty Trust-- by $112 million, offering to pay $1.004 billion for the rights to develop the 26-acre site.

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