High Line Blog

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Author: 
Anonymous
The development process for the West Side Rail Yards could be on the verge of an important milestone, which comes as a surprise to many who assumed this process would be slowed in the wake of economic uncertainty and the recent shakeup in state government.

Author: 
rickatthehighline
fsc
 

In the first of many steps toward improving the environmentally- and socially-responsible practices of our organization, FHL is proud to announce that in January 2008, we began utilizing paper stocks and printers certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) for our printed materials.

Author: 
Anonymous
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Another rainy day up on the Line. Raindrops (and abandoned flip flops) found their way into one of the test pits dug on the High Line before construction began. This shot is from 2005.

Previous Photo of the Week:
Author: 
Anonymous
 
Another addition to the burgeoning architectural wonderland that is West Chelsea.

Author: 
Danya Sherman
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On Tuesday night we had our first membership event: a lecture with the High Line's planting designer, Piet Oudolf. You may have seen Piet's beautiful work in the gardens at Battery Park City, Millennium Park in Chicago, or at other sites elsewhere around the world.

Piet discussed his theory of planting design, which he describes as "inspired by nature". He then took us through the planting design plan for the High Line. The planting beds will vary based on the landscape design; some areas will be planted to feel more like a meadow, some a prairie, some woodland, and so on. This variation is based on the different microclimates that developed naturally on the High Line after trains stopped running on it. Piet also uses perennials that require less maintenance, and will look good throughout all four seasons.


'Brown is also a color': Planting Design Piet Oudolf Accepts Death

Another one of Piet's presentations is on our Web site.

Photos from Tuesday's presentation are after the jump.


Author: 
Anonymous
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This is one of our favorite historical images. The West Side Cowboys were employed by the City to ride in front of street-level freight trains and wave pedestrians out of the way. This was the City's stopgap measure to stop the carnage on what was known as "Death Avenue." The Cowboys were phased out after the High Line was built, raising train traffic to the third story of industrial buildings. The cowboy above is from the 1930's, when the High Line was being built, and the structure is visible in the background. The cowboy below dates from 1911, before the High Line was a glimmer in its daddy's eye.

Photo from Shorpy.com, the 100-Year-Old Photo Blog. Note the guy with the pegleg.
After the jump, the 1934 London Terrace Tatler waxes eloquent about the Cowboys and their brave ponies.

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