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Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago's Lying Figure among the High Line's original rail tracks. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

The time has come to bid farewell to Thomas Houseago’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Lying Figure, installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street. Lying Figure is a 15-foot-long bronze sculpture of a headless giant, leaning on its elbows between the High Line’s original rail tracks.

Follow the jump to read more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
El Anatsui in front of his HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

This past fall Art21 stopped by the High Line to film the installation of El Anatsui’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II, located on a wall adjacent to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Streets.

Follow us after the jump to watch the video.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
 

In celebration of Richard Artschwager’s blp installation, High Line Art, the Whitney Museum, and The Standard, New York, invite you to participate in the collective documentation of the project.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the contest!

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

In last week’s New York Observer, writer Andrew Russeth spoke with El Anatsui about his theory and process behind Broken Bridge II, his largest public artwork to date, which is now on view at the High Line.

“I felt the skyline is a strong defining element of this city, so the mirrors form large segments of the top. They invite the sky and skyline into the work in such a way that you do not know where mirrors end and sky begins,” the artist told the Observer.

Follow us after the jump to watch a timelapse video of the installation.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
One of Richard Artschwager's blps at 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Austin Kennedy. Courtesy the artist, Friends of the High Line, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.
 

If you've visited the park recently, you may have noticed black lozenge-shaped marks on and around the High Line. The marks are called “blps” and they are part of one of our latest HIGH LINE COMMISSIONS, an installation by acclaimed artist Richard Artschwager.

The work is the first collaboration between High Line Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is building its downtown location next to the High Line’s southern terminus. You can find 9 blps installed in various locations through Sunday, February 3, 2013, in conjunction with the artist’s retrospective Richard Artschwager! at the museum.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and watch.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Virginia OvertonInstallation view of Virginia Overton's Untitled in the stacked parking lot next to the High Line at West 20th Street. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

Hidden among the shiny cars in the tiered parking lot next to the High Line at West 20th Street rests a modest looking pickup truck. At first glance, this 1994 2WD Toyota appears to be just another vehicle waiting for its owner to take it for a ride, but look closely. As the brick-filled bed begins to materialize, the piece start to fall into place.

Follow us after the break to learn more.

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