Christian Barclay's blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Liz Ligon Participants take their spot on the line. Photo by Liz Ligon

How long is a minute?

This was the question posed by artist David Lamelas during his performance Time Line on the High Line. The interactive piece took place in three different locations throughout the park on July 22, 23, and 24. Park visitors were invited to stand along a white strip of tape and "pass along" the time. The performance began with an announcement of the time to the first participant in line. That person “held” the time for an estimated one minute, at which point they then announced the time out loud and “passed” it to the next person. Visitors were encouraged to join the line at any point and to use their native language to announce the time, thereby adding their own subjective sense of time to the performance’s duration.

So, how long is a minute? Sixty seconds.

Author: 
Christian Barclay

On July 16 and 17, High Line Art presented Misty Malarky Ying Yang, a new performance by artist Ryan McNamara that celebrated the 35th anniversary of President Jimmy Carter’s famous 1979 “Malaise Speech.”

The nationally televised speech focused on the ongoing energy crisis. Carter pronounced that the American standard of fossil-fuel gluttony would have to end, and the solution would be self-sacrifice as much as policy. His candor went over well for a few days, until the American public realized that the President was pointing the finger squarely at them. It is known as the final nail in the Carter administration’s coffin. For the High Line Performance, McNamara and a group of dancers used the infamous speech as the point of departure for a choreographed spectacle.

The piece began each night at 7:30 PM, at the south end of the park at Gansevoort Street. An enclosed case held the performance materials – a collection of unforgiving lilac printed unitards. The four dancers posed, vogued, and skipped their way through the park in a succession of choreographed sequences, all the while reciting the infamous speech word for word. As the group made their way through the park, the crowd swelled with curious passersby, including a few bemused teens from a nearby High Line Teens dance party.

At risk of turning this into a “you had to be there” post, we’ve chosen a few of our favorite Instagram photos from each night of the performance. Hopefully they convey the energy and dynamism of this singularly kooky piece.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Josh Kline's Skittles part of the High Line Art group exhibition, Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Josh Kline’s Skittles, part of the group exhibition Archeo, is an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients, including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray. Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by @aloarowa

There are very few (good) reasons to awake at 5:30 AM, but the promise of a picturesque sunrise and room to roam brought out a snap-happy group of Instagrammers to the park on Wednesday, July 23. We joined with Instagram to welcome a small group to visit the park before it opened and document their adventures. The event, #emptyhighline, produced dozens of beautiful shots that captured the park in an early morning glow.

Check out some of our favorites below, and follow @highlinenyc and @highlineartnyc for more beautiful photos of the park.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Gardener John GundersonGardener John Gunderson has been with Friends of the High Line since 2011. Photo by Friends of the High Line

While the High Line is meant to look like a wild landscape, it requires an extraordinary amount of work to maintain the plant life. The horticulture team is responsible for maintaining the park’s more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees. In our first Staff Spotlight, we’re focusing on John Gunderson, a gardener who’s been with Friends of the High Line for three years.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Joel Sternfeld Joel Sternfeld, Fallen Billboard, November 2000. Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York.

"As soon as Joel saw it, he took me aside and said, 'I want to do this. Don’t let anyone else up here for a year. I will give you beautiful photos.'" – High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond, High Line: The Inside Story of New York City’s Park in the Sky

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Juan ValentinVisitors enjoying the water feature on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. Photo by Juan Valentin
 

Take a break from pounding the pavement by visiting the water feature on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. Rising temperatures make this spot a great place to seek cool comfort, and the closed-circulation system adds sustainable function to sleek form. Located near the West 14th Street entrance, it’s the perfect place to rest and re-energize before a stroll through the park.

Subscribe to RSS - Christian Barclay's blog