Erika Harvey's blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Dancing to the rhythms of Juan Morales and Sonido Costeño during ¡Arriba! Photo by Liz Ligon
 

This summer, you will find some of New York City’s best Latin bands at the High Line. It is all part of ¡Arriba! – our series of free, community dance parties, presented in partnership with HAI and Hudson Guild and supported by MetLife Foundation.

Last week more than 400 people danced to the salsa and merengue rhythms by Juan Morales and Sonido Costeño. We would like to thank everyone for joining us, and congratulate our raffle prize winners, Dennisse and Martin, who went home with our newly-designed High Line tote bags, and Rosa, who picked up a $75 gift certificate to Terroir at The Porch.

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Follow us after the jump to view photos, and get the details for the ¡Arriba! in August, where we’ll be bringing Nu D’Lux to the High Line for an evening of Cuban beats.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
“Decisions, decisions,” Rhesa Storms tweeted to accompany her #shareameal photo submission. Photo by Rhesa Storms.
 

This is the first season that you can enjoy both sweet and savory food offerings at the High Line.

To celebrate the moments made possible by delicious food, great company, and a one-of-a-kind public space, we asked you to share your photos with us on Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #shareameal.

The winner in July was Rhesa Storms, who took an adorable photo of her young friend peering over the edge of Melt Bakery’s cart on the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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We asked you to choose which movie would kick off High Line Teen Picks, our free summer movie series curated by local teens and presented by AT&T.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The Neches River mallow is currently a candidate for the US’ Endangered Species List. This beautiful plant only occurs naturally in three wetlands in eastern Texas.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
On Wednesday, we invited kids and their caretakers to release butterflies into the park’s planting beds, and watch as they spread their wings to take their first flight. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This summer we’re unveiling new High Line merchandise, including engineer caps for adults and kids that pay tribute to the High Line’s railway history.
 

We’ve designed an entire line of new High Line merchandise, and it is now available in the High Line Web Shop and at the High Line Merchandise & Membership Cart, which is open every Wednesday through Sunday from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM on the High Line at West 16th Street.

The new merchandise celebrates the High Line’s plantings, innovative design, and history as a railway with vibrant photographs and unique graphics. Featured images include trains on the High Line, West Side Cowboys, some of your favorite summer blooms, and incredible scenic views of the park. You’ll also find brand-new High Line gear – from engineer caps to notebooks – allowing you to show your support of the park in style.

Join us after the jump for a look at the new merchandise.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Visitors interact with the Project Runway installation on the High Line this past Tuesday. Photo by Liz Ligon.
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Roosevelt Park sits in front of Michigan Central Station, the old railway station that seen a train in over two decades. Leaders from the Roosevelt Park Conservancy, the organization that is implementing capital improvements and developing a master plan for the site, will be at the High Line on Monday, July 23 to talk about public spaces in Detroit. Photo by David Schalliol.
 

The High Line gets a lot of attention, but it is one of many examples of officials, advocates, and community leaders joining together to transform out-of-use infrastructure into public space.

Beyond the High Line is a new series of free public talks bringing some of the country’s most innovative thinkers to the High Line to present their big ideas and talk about the latest updates. The series debuted in June, with a talk about Chicago’s Bloomingdale Trail (WATCH THE VIDEO), and continues on Monday, July 23 with a focus on new and revived public spaces in Detroit. Join us to talk with leaders from the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy and the Roosevelt Park Conservancy, and enjoy a reception with Coney Dogs and Motown music.

Follow us after the jump for photos and video from the Chicago talk.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Joshua David, Anisa Kamadoli Costa, Mayor Bloomberg, Michael J. Kowaski, and Fernanda M. Kellogg gathered on the High Line to dedicate the Tiffany & Co. Foundation Overlook. Photo by Nicholas Hunt / PatrickMcMullan.com
 

On Tuesday, Mayor Bloomberg visited the High Line to commemorate the naming of one of the park’s best-loved design features. The newly dedicated Tiffany & Co. Foundation Overlook, at the southern end of the High Line, forms a glass-walled balcony over the city streets below. The cut of the structure, created when a portion of the High Line was demolished in 1991, allows visitors to see the High Line’s structural framework and views of Greenwich Village, the Meatpacking District, and the Hudson River.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Near the 23rd Street Lawn, the High Line’s Abbeville Blue chaste trees are in bloom with distinctive lavender-blue flowers.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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