Erika Harvey's blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Erika Harvey
L'Arte del Gelato's frozen treats combine a variety of high-quality ingredients including the recent addition of milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery. Photos: top by Lou Manna, courtesy of L'Arte del Gelato; bottom courtesy of Battenkill Valley Creamery.
 

High Line Food is committed to working with entrepreneurial food partners whose products are good for the people eating the food, good for those who grow it, and good for the land. With this core philosophy in mind, we were thrilled when returning food partner L’Arte del Gelato decided to make the switch to locally-sourced milk for their full-range of gelati on offer at the High Line.

This new sustainably-produced New York State milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery is a great addition to their already impressive roster of high quality ingredients.

“Italians know that the secret to good food is to step back and let the ingredients speak for themselves!” L’Arte del Gelato co-founder Francesco Realmuto says. “Using Battenkill Valley Creamery milk for all of our High Line gelati is a great way to showcase delicious local food from right here in New York State.”

Learn more about the family farm supplying L’Arte del Gelato’s milk after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Ronnit Bendavid-Val brings over a decade of experience managing New York City parks to her new position at the High Line
 

The High Line is meant to look like a wild landscape, but it requires an extraordinary amount of work to maintain the plant life and keep the park clean and welcoming for its visitors.

With more than one mile of parkland, mechanical infrastructure, and unique operational challenges, it takes close coordination of a team of dedicated gardeners, custodians, technicians, and more to keep an elevated park like the High Line running smoothly. That’s why we are pleased to welcome Ronnit Bendavid-Val to our staff, as our new Vice President of Horticulture & Park Operations.

Ronnit brings over a decade of experience with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation to her new position of overseeing our team of horticultural and maintenance staff.

Join us after the jump and get to know Ronnit.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Peregrine falcons are just one of the many birds that you may be surprised to see at the High Line. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

The High Line’s plantings are not only beautiful – they provide a year-round oasis for both local and migratory birds. From wooded areas that are good for nesting, to dried seed heads left intact over the winter that offer a source of food during the cold season, the High Line is a natural habitat for urban birds.

In this series of blog posts, we’ll be joined by High Line Gardener and resident naturalist Maryanne Stubbs, for a closer look at the birds you’ll find at the High Line.

Learn more about the High Line’s year-long winged residents after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Twisted-leaf garlic, Allium obliquum, is an edible in the garlic family.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 

The wonders of the carnival await you on Tuesday, June 19. Prepare to be dazzled and delighted with spiked snow cones, games and prizes, and music by DJ Kiss.

We hope you’ll join us for our annual Summer Party on the High Line presented by Coach   it’s a great way to have fun and support the ongoing maintenance and operations of the park at the same time.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Sicilian honey garlic, Allium siculum subspecies dioscoridis, is one of the many alliums that’s popping up in the High Line’s planting beds.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The buds of Eastern redbud Appalachian Red begins to appear along the branches of the tree in mid-March. These vibrant blooms were one of the many spectacular displays in the park this spring. Photo by Steven Severinghaus.
 

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Over the past six weeks, as volunteers and staff worked hard to trim back dried plant material during Spring Cutback, the park’s plants have reemerged with new spring growth. It’s the perfect time to be in the park – you’ll find blooms covering shrubs and trees, vibrant green grasses, and spring bulbs popping up everywhere.

Here is a look back at the progression of spring, as seen by contributors to the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beneath the concrete planks and beautiful plantings is an advanced system for water drainage and retention. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

While you’re walking along the High Line, you may not realize it, but below your feet is an intricate drainage system that helps to reduce storm water runoff and helps to keep our planting beds healthy.

Here’s an inside peek at what’s happening under the surface of the world’s longest green roof.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
(Left) Neighborhood kids helped create a community mural during Earth Day in the Sky activities. (Right) Alison Knowles’ Make a Salad invited the audience to take part in the performance by sharing a meal of fresh spring greens. Photos by Liz Ligon.
 

On Sunday, April 22, we hosted the High Line’s first-ever Earth Day celebration to mark the end of Spring Cutback, our biggest horticultural task of the year, and the beginning of a busy spring season.

View photos from the day after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 


Mother’s Day is May 13. Are you looking to make your Mom’s day even more special this year?

Now until Saturday, May 12, you will receive a complimentary High Line Plant Guide with your purchase of our newly-created High Line Note Cards – the perfect gift for moms.

Visit the High Line Web Shop to purchase a note card set today. Orders placed by Sunday, May 6 are guaranteed to arrive by Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 13.*

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Erika Harvey's blog