Erika Harvey's blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pallida witch hazel produces vibrant yellow flowers early in the year. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
An illustration by designer and author Vahram Muratyan comparing the Promenade Plantée, or Coulée Verte, and the High Line. The illustration is part of his new book, Paris vs. New York: A Tally of Two Cities. Image courtesy of the author and Penguin Books.
 

Paris and New York — two cultural centers an ocean apart have a friendly rivalry that’s older than time. Whether you prefer shopping the Champs Elysées or 5th Avenue, spending a rainy day reading Le Temps Retrouvé or The Catcher in the Rye, or snacking on a macaron or a cupcake — you will appreciate designer Vahram Muratyan’s witty side-by-sides of these two iconic cities.

Vahram’s comparisons of Paris and New York, and the Promenade Plantée and the High Line, give us yet another reason to celebrate the Parisian park for its inspiration. Here we take a closer look of at the High Line’s predecessor.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
joan garvin

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hyemi Cho’s portraits peek out of the windows of neighboring apartment buildings and playfully engage High Line visitors. Photo by Meg Kinney.
 

High Line visitors are often surprised to see smiling faces gazing back at them, and even waving, from the windows of neighboring buildings toward the northern terminus of the park. After the initial double-take, it’s easy to realize that these amusing locals are not flesh-and-blood people, but rather a playful ruse.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This particular cultivar of witch hazel blooms in the winter when most other plants are dormant.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 


What is going on in this video?

You might think the light show is part of a public art installation or ambiance for a dance party, but this is what it looks like in the moments before a black-out on the High Line.

Managing one mile of park built on an elevated freight rail line presents unique operational challenges. Like any building in the city, the High Line has millions of dollars worth of mechanical systems – lighting and electrical infrastructure, plumbing and irrigation, and more – and it’s all connected to the city’s utility lines. When the power supply is cut nearby, it can affect the lighting system at the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The first snowfall of the year was an opportunity to take some great photos of the High Line. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

The first winter storm arrived in New York City on Saturday, blanketing the High Line with a light coating of snow. Our maintenance and operations staff arrived before dawn to begin clearing the pathways, making the park safe for visitors to enjoy the High Line’s winter landscape.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Present throughout the park, ‘The Blues’ little bluestem is a wispy grass that produces fluffy silver seed heads that remain beautiful through the winter months.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardener Kaspar Wittlinger leads a tool tune-up session for High Line Gardeners and High Line Volunteers. Here he shows the group the proper technique for sharpening a pair of pruning shears.
 

At this time of year, we get this question all the time: “What do the gardeners do in the winter?”

There is noticeably less activity in the planting beds on the High Line in the winter, but our gardeners are just as busy. They take advantage of the lull in the growing season to plan and prepare for the year to come, and they are also called into action to help ensure the park is safe for the public after snow and ice storms. Here’s a little insight into what the High Line Gardeners are up to in the colder months of the year.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 
Photographer Ben Thomas’ playful tilt-shift cityscapes visually evoke miniature scale models. Here, at 30 feet above the street on the High Line, the camera’s gaze looks east toward the intersection of West 23rd Street and 10th Avenue.
 

One of our favorite ways to stay updated on park life from the office is by skimming through the High Line Flickr Pool. Hundreds of talented professional photographers and aspiring amateurs have shared their images of park visitors and the High Line’s architecture, horticulture, and the cityscape beyond.

One recent contributor, Ben Thomas, caught our eye with his tilt-shift photographs, which trick the eye to make the High Line, and the views from it, look like miniature scale models.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Erika Harvey's blog