Erika Harvey's blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues on High Line Headquarters and the future location of the Whitney Museum of American Art as lush spring foliage pops up along the southern end of the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Crews are busy installing the interior finishes to High Line Headquarters, a four-story building located next to the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is also under construction.

Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, High Line Headquarters will serve as a critical gathering space for visitors, with a new elevator, public restrooms, and a public meeting room when it opens later this year.

The building will also help keep the High Line’s landscape thriving, by giving gardeners, custodians, and maintenance technicians direct access between storage facilities and the park. This will streamline the transfer of materials, vehicles, and equipment -- one of the current challenges of maintaining a park elevated 30 feet above the street.

Stay up to date on the construction of High Line Headquarters by signing up the High Line E-News.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This native sedge displays subtle fluffy blooms this time of year

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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This week we bid farewell to talented High Line Photographer David Wilkinson, who is moving back to London.

Over the past few seasons, David has worked with Friends of the High Line to capture stunning images of the park’s plants, artworks, and visitors. You may remember a recent Photo of the Week featuring David’s cheery photograph of spring crocus emerging.

See more of David’s photos of the High Line and New York City.

David will be greatly missed, but we look forward to seeing him turn his lens to subjects across the pond.







Author: 
Erika Harvey
The flowers of Whitespire gray birch come in the form of “catkins,” long cylindrical compound flowers that bloom in the spring.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line staffer Sarah enjoys a treat from High Line Food vendor La Newyorkina. Photo by Jenna Saraco

Today we celebrated the mouth-watering reopening of High Line Food!

It’s exciting to see returning and new vendors’ carts bustling with activity as delicious tacos, BBQ, gelato, popsicles, pretzels, and more are served up to hungry visitors. You may even catch some Friends of the High Line staff frequenting their lunchtime—and “ice-cream sandwich break”-time—favorites.

Plan your next lunch break on the High Line, and stop by between Little West 12th and West 16th Streets to discover our new lineup. Tweet your experience or share photos of High Line Food on Instagram by tagging @highlinenyc and #shareameal.

Read more about the 2013 High Line Food vendors.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line’s spring landscape is characterized by bunches of colorful spring bulbs, like Hawera daffodils.The High Line’s spring landscape is characterized by bunches of colorful spring bulbs, like Hawera daffodils.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A red-breasted American robin perches on historic rail tracks along the High Line. Photo by Juan Valentin

The signs of spring are all around us at the High Line. Trees are budding and new spring blooms are popping up daily. And, if you look carefully, there is also a renewed flurry of feathered activity returning to the park.

High Line Photographer Juan Valentin captured this photo of an American robin, Turdus migratorius, during a visit this past weekend. Most American robins migrate to warmer climates in the winter, literally flocking to Florida and Mexico, and then return north in the early spring to breed. You may catch these early risers pulling up worms from lawns, eating berries, and gathering twigs or grass for their nests.

Even if the birds are out of sight, you may recognize their distinctive call which is characterized as cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up – a nice reminder that sunnier spring days are coming soon.

Learn more about other birds you may see at the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey


Our new video series My High Line highlights the many uses of the High Line, and the people who call it their own.

The inaugural video portrait features Gammy Miller, a High Line Volunteer and long-time resident of the West Village.

Join us after the jump to discover her High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful ornamental is popular in Japan due to its plentiful blooms where it’s also common in bonsai form.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A young couple embraces in front of High Line Art’s newest billboard commission, Blue Falling, by artist Ryan McGinley. Photo by Timothy Schenck

This week, a new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD was installed next to the High Line at West 18th Street. April’s installation features a cool-hued photograph by artist Ryan McGinley of a figure floating effortlessly through a vast blue background.

The levity of being and freeness evoked in the new installation complement the spring spirit at the park. As weather warms – slowly, but surely! – and new spring growth appears to the delight of visitors and High Line staff alike, the park is infused with the spirit of a new season ahead.

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this photo of visitors in front of the new billboard earlier this week. Stop by before April 30 to see it yourself.

Learn more about Blue Falling.

Share your photos with us in the High Line Flickr Pool, or tag @highlineartnyc on Instagram or Twitter.

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