Erika Harvey's blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey


Our new video series My High Line highlights the many uses of the High Line, and the people who call it their own.

The inaugural video portrait features Gammy Miller, a High Line Volunteer and long-time resident of the West Village.

Join us after the jump to discover her High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful ornamental is popular in Japan due to its plentiful blooms where it’s also common in bonsai form.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A young couple embraces in front of High Line Art’s newest billboard commission, Blue Falling, by artist Ryan McGinley. Photo by Timothy Schenck

This week, a new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD was installed next to the High Line at West 18th Street. April’s installation features a cool-hued photograph by artist Ryan McGinley of a figure floating effortlessly through a vast blue background.

The levity of being and freeness evoked in the new installation complement the spring spirit at the park. As weather warms – slowly, but surely! – and new spring growth appears to the delight of visitors and High Line staff alike, the park is infused with the spirit of a new season ahead.

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this photo of visitors in front of the new billboard earlier this week. Stop by before April 30 to see it yourself.

Learn more about Blue Falling.

Share your photos with us in the High Line Flickr Pool, or tag @highlineartnyc on Instagram or Twitter.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This brightly-colored perennial is native to the mountainous regions of Turkey, where it will often pop up through a layer of snow in early spring.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pussy Willows are named for their soft cat fur-like blooms that herald spring.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This week High Line Gardeners and volunteers trimmed back the bog plants and grasses that grow along the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck, making way for new green growth. Photo by Oliver Rich

We have just completed the third week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to make way for new green growth. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See more photos from our third week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A light dusting of snow tops the knit hat of Old Singer with Blossoms, by artist Alessandro Pessoli. Pessoli was one of six artists commissioned to create a sculpture for the High Line's first group exhibition, Lilliput. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Dawn bodnant viburnum has bright pink flowers that are at their peak this time of year. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This week, we trimmed back the majority of the dried grasses and plant stalks in the Wildflower Field, on the High Line between West 27th and West 29th Streets. Pictured here are High Line Gardeners Mark and Maeve working beneath the towering JR mural at West 29th Street. Photo by Mike Tschappat

We have just completed the second week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to make way for new green growth. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See more photos from our second week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
As the weather warms, some of the season’s first spring bulbs are popping up along the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you two of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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