Erika Harvey's blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
A Northern Mockingbird discovers delicious berries on the High Line’s winter landscape. Photo by Matt MacGillivray
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Bundle up and get ready for some wintertime exercise. Join our team of snow volunteers. Photo by Marcin Wichary
 

It's all hands on deck when snow arrives in New York City, and we'd love your help!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 
This is the last week to check out the advertising billboard for John Masters Organics, next to the High Line at West 20th Street.
 

If you’ve recently walked the High Line, you’ve probably come face-to-face with an advertisement for John Masters Organics, featuring a beautiful, 100-foot-tall man, with enviable washboard abs and a come-hither gaze to warm the soul.

Follow us after the jump for more on the latest in the High Line’s billboard saga.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line’s winter landscape is characterized by the dried stalks and seed heads of plants, like the compass plant.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
30th StreetA December scene in the 10th Avenue Square, as seen from below. Photo by Alan Greig
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Wintersweet blooms are produced on older growth, and High this season marks the first flowering at the park.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Year End Blog Post: header image


Follow us after the jump to check out a video montage highlighting our favorite events and happenings at the High Line in 2012.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
 

Visit the High Line in December and you may be surprised to see two zebras peering out from a billboard at West 18th Street. This month, High Line Art presents a new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD commission, Untitled (zebras), by artist Paola Pivi.

Author: 
Erika Harvey


Project Runway All Stars is going green! Earlier this year, the cast of the hit show’s second season gathered at the High Line for a unique design challenge.

The episode airs tomorrow on Lifetime, and we can’t wait to see what the designers dream up.

Join us after the jump for more details, photos, and airing information.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful evergreen shrub blooms with fragrant yellow flowers in the winter months.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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