Erika Harvey's blog

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Chelsea GrasslandsNow is the time to enjoy the brilliant seasonal foliage of swamp azalea on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets. Photo by Josiah Lau
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Main image - gift guide

Visit the High Line Web Shop to find exclusive holiday gifts and fun stocking stuffers for all ages.

As we enter the holiday season, consider giving special people in your life a gift from the High Line. Our apparel, products, and books are perfect for architecture geeks, design enthusiasts, green thumbs, urban planners, and children alike. What’s more, every purchase from our High Line Web Shop directly supports the High Line’s ongoing maintenance, helping us keep the park beautiful, clean, and welcoming all year long.

Follow us after the jump to see our favorite gift ideas for the 2012 holiday season.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photos by (left and upper right) Rowa Lee and (lower right) Juan Valentin
 

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for the High Line. We’ve been so busy with recovery from Hurricane Sandy that we haven’t yet had a chance to share photos and stories from our favorite fall community event: Haunted High Line Halloween.

On Saturday, October 27, hundreds of families brought their Halloween spirit to the High Line for a spooky scavenger hunt, tasty treats, a dress-up photo booth, a pop-up pumpkin patch, face painting, live jazz and swing music, and more.

Join us after the jump for more photos and details about the event.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Fany Gerson, Chef/Owner of LaNewyorkina, led two sessions of Play With Your Food, creating healthy fruit parfaits and guacamole at an impromptu kitchen at the Seating Steps, on the High Line at West 22nd Street. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Over the course of September, our High Line Food vendors lent their talents to help us teach little ones about healthy eating during Play With Your Food, a free weekly drop-in program. Chefs from People’s Pops, LaNewyorkina, and Terroir participated, working with kids to craft culinary creations using fresh foods.

Join us after the jump for photos from the programs.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Asters are one of the iconic flowers you see at the High Line in the fall. Raydon’s Favorite aromatic aster is a cultivar that produces prolific purple and yellow blooms that shouldn’t be missed. Photo by Patrick Cullina
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Cutleaf Staghorn sumac is just one of several varieties of sumac grown at the High Line. Sumac trees are known for their brilliant fall foliage. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful aerial photo gives a different perspective of the High Line and the surrounding city. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

High Line Photographer Melissa Mansur captured this amazing rainy day aerial photo of the High Line during an openhousenewyork tour at The Standard, New York last weekend.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Under The Standard, New YorkTartarian aster is just one of the many varieties of aster you’ll find in bloom at the High Line this season. The plants’ distinctive lavender blooms are a sure sign that autumn has arrived at the park.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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