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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Steven SeveringhausIn the Washington Grasslands – as in other parts of the park – the bright colors of summer flowers are fading and the golden autumn tones of grasses are beginning to take over the landscape. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The breeze has taken on a crisp edge, the earthy green scent of prairie dropseed is floating across the park, and some of the summer's favorite flowers are fading. Autumn is on its way.

Before you lament the passing of summer, remember that there's so much to look forward to with fall. There's the gorgeous autumnal foliage, hot drinks from Blue Bottle, and a host of fall blooms, like my favorite, asters.

See more of September's blooms on our monthly bloom list. And don't forget to join us next weekend, on Sunday, September 21, when the third and northernmost section of the park, theHigh Line at the Rail Yards opens to the public.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A busy day in the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie CrimminsA busy day in the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

This summer has seemed to fly by! If you’re anything like us, you’re thrilled to soak up every last drop of sunshine this September, as thoughts turn to cooler fall temperatures.

The 10th Avenue Square, captured here by High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins, is one of park visitors’ favorite gathering spaces. Whether enjoying a bite to eat from one of the High Line’s food vendors – tacos and ice pops, need we say more? – or taking respite after a long walk, it’s the perfect place to relax, unwind, and enjoy the High Line’s unique vantage point on New York City.

Once you’ve come out of hiding after this weekend’s projected rain storms, enjoy some sunshine at your favorite NYC summer locale with friends or family.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hummingbird moth. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA snowberry clearwing moth, commonly known as a hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a prairie sage bloom on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s gardens aren’t just visited and appreciated by people, there are also a host of six- and eight-legged bugs who drop by. You’ll find the beloved honeybee, innocuous milkweed bugs and corn spiders, lesser-liked oriental beetles, a variety of beautiful butterflies, and even beneficial bugs like ladybug and lacewings that our gardeners purposefully release in order to combat pests. One of the rarer sights, a hummingbird moth, Hemaris diffinis, was captured earlier this month by High Line Photographer – and documenter of all things winged – Steven Severinghaus.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line at night. Photo by Timothy SchenckA view looking out across the High Line, 10th Avenue, and the New York City skyline. Photo by Timothy Schenck

New York City is a city at its most enchanting after dark. The glow of neon signs, the patchwork of lit windows in tall buildings, and the jagged twinkling skyline of buildings in the distance bring new life to familiar forms. And, if it’s not obvious, we love, love, love night on the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line's Northern Spur Preserve in different seasons. Photo by Steven SeveringhausSeasonal flora on the Northern Spur Preserve. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

We are so often delighted by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus 's ability to capture the changing seasons in the park’s gardens. There’s no better vantage point from which to observe the transitions of the foliage and blooms than from the perch above the Northern Spur Preserve, a sentiment Steven no doubt shares. This quadriptych that Steven created shows the Northern Spur Preserve, located on the High Line at West 16th Street, through a reverse of seasons – winter through summer.

See more photosof the park at its peak in the summer season.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Joshua David and Robert Hammond at the Rail YardsFriends of the High Line Co-founders Joshua David (left) and Robert Hammond (right) on the Rail Yards section of the High Line in 2001. Photo by Joel Sternfeld, courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York

On this day 15 years ago, an article on the High Line ran in the New York Times. In it, a new idea was proposed for the elevated rail, which was slated for demolition at the time. CSX Transportation Inc., which had just acquired the derelict railway, hoped that it might be converted into public space via the federal “Rail to Trails” program.

In what would be a turning point for the historic structure, two men who didn’t know one another at the time – Joshua David and Robert Hammond – read the article and felt moved to change the High Line’s fate. In a sense, today marks the true 15th birthday of Friends of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A honeybee enjoys the High Line. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA honeybee enjoys a visit to the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

In anticipation of High Line Honey Day on July 30, we’re exploring the world of honeybees. We invited Dan Carr, Assistant Livestock Manager at Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, to introduce our readers to this industrious little insect. Stone Barns Center is a non-profit farm and education center located in Westchester County, New York. In addition to caring for honeybees, Dan and the Livestock Staff members oversee sheep, pigs, chickens, and other animals.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Supermoon over the High Line. Photo by Mike TschappatOn Friday evening and early Saturday morning this past week, New Yorkers were treated to a larger-than-life moon, or “supermoon.” Photo by Mike Tschappat

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured this striking photo of a “supermoon” last Friday, while perched on the High Line with his long lens and tripod. A supermoon is exactly what it sounds like: a larger-than-life appearance of a full moon. This celestial event – which has the unfortunate and un-catchy scientific designation of “perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system” – happens when a full moon coincides with the moment in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to the earth. This results in a noticeably larger-than-normal appearance of the moon in the night’s sky. Happily, we have two more supermoons to look forward to this summer – one on August 10 and another on September 9.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckIsabelle Cornaro's artwork stands amid a canopy of trees and cheery hedgenettle. Photo by Timothy Schenck

The presence of High Line Art’s group exhibition Archeo changes with the seasons. In summer, as lush foliage reaches up, encircles, and even obscures parts of the artworks, the visitor’s experience is almost that of a treasure hunt. Rather than seeing an artwork from a block away, sometimes a pause or slower walking pace is necessary to notice a piece peeking out from the back of a planting bed.

The three sculptures of God Box (column) by French artist Isabelle Cornaro – one of which is pictured here – are both alien and familiar, and both at home and foreign within the High Line’s landscape. One can imagine they are monuments of a futuristic society or that they were dropped here by visitors from another planet. After all, that was High Line Art Curator Cecilia Alemani’s intention.

“On the High Line – where freight trains used to run 30 feet above the street, in a landscape worthy of the futuristic machinations of a science fiction movie – the sculptures presented in Archeo punctuate the landscape in unusual ways, creating a gallery of artifacts from a futuristic past,” Cecilia said at Archeo’s installation earlier this spring.

Download the current High Line Art Map to learn more about all of High Line Art’s current artworks on view.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Mike Tschappat

The beauty of the High Line’s gardens is that the planting beds are an ever-changing palette of textures and colors. This time of year, as plants soak up the summer sun, their foliage seems to grow thicker and thicker each day, sometimes even reaching out into the pathway or over the railings. Summer blooms add fresh pops of color here and there: pink, white, and pale yellow coneflowers, vibrant copper-colored foxtail lilies, bright orange pollen dusting leadplant and purple prairie clover blooms, and so much more.

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat posted a batch of recent photos capturing nearly all of this season’s blooms and it was incredibly difficult to choose just one to be our Photo of the Week. We chose this one, because it features two of our visitors’ favorite blooms of the season: foxtail lilies, Eremurus stenophyllus, and Vintage Wine coneflowers, Echinacea purpurea ‘Vintage Wine.’

Want more reasons to visit the High Line right now? See the rest of Mike’s photos on his Flickr page, and download our monthly bloom list to learn more about this season’s floral highlights.

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