Jennette Mullaney's blog

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Jennette Mullaney
The High Line in summer. Photo by Juan ValentinThe High Line's gardens are lush with blooms and green growth in the summer. Photo by Juan Valentin

There's nothing like a brutal, overlong winter to make one appreciate a summer garden. On those days when the sun is hot and you're tempted to hurry by beautiful blooms, remember this. And this. And that mid-April snow-ice-storm that brought our long-awaited #CrocusWatch2014 to a harsh and unceremonious end.

Treasure the miracle that is the summer garden.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Great Museums has created a new documentary about the High Line, Elevated Thinking: The High Line in New York City. The piece details the remarkable transformation of the High Line and the people who made it possible.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
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Melt Bakery by Armando Rafael PhotographyJulian Plyter of Melt Bakery talks with High Line visitors. Photo by Armando Rafael Photography

Melt Bakery was one of the first vendors selected for the High Line Food program, and Melt's decadent, locally sourced ice-cream sandwiches have become park staples. As part of our High Line anniversary celebrations, we sat down with Melt chef Julian Plyter and asked him to share some memories from his years in the park.

You've witnessed a lot of interesting things on the High Line during your time here. Tell us one of your favorite stories.

I love how many newly married couples have eaten a Melt sandwich on the High Line as their first food shared as a married couple. Such an honor and so much fun! I've shared a few photos as evidence.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
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Photo by Jonathan FlaumHigh Line B&W 15, November 2001, by Jonathan Flaum

This year the High Line celebrates three important milestones: the 15th anniversary of the founding of Friends of the High Line, the fifth anniversary of the opening of the first section of the park, and the opening of the third and northernmost section of the historic railway. The High Line’s transformation from a derelict structure to one of New York City’s beloved public spaces is due to the tireless and dedicated work of thousands of supporters, donors, volunteers, staff members, and elected officials. The following is a snapshot of some of the more memorable highlights on the incredible journey Friends of the High Line began nearly 15 years ago.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausVisitors take in the moon while sitting on the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, the elevated walkway on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets. If you'd like to observe the heavens through high-powered telescopes, join us for stargazing with the Amateur Astronomers Association. This free event is held in the park each Tuesday evening, weather permitting, from April through October. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line is an urban oasis, with an emphasis on "urban" – even amid the park's tallest trees, one is still very much aware of the city. Once night falls this impression is even greater, as flowers and branches fade into shadow and the lights of New York City shine brightly in the evening sky.

It is thanks to the High Line's innovative lighting system that the evening cityscape is visible from the park. Designed by Hervé Descottes of L’Observatoire International, the energy-efficient LED lighting is installed no higher than waist-level so that pathways are illuminated without creating overhead glare.

L’Observatoire's International was recently named the jury winner of the Architizer A+ Award in the Architecture + Light category for its work on the High Line. In honor of this achievement, we're presenting a collection of images that capture the magic of this innovative design, and have asked Descottes to share his thoughts on them.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Rowa LeeBlue Bottle Coffee's fennel-parmesan shortbread is a sweet-and-savory treat. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Blue Bottle Coffee might be better known for its, well, awesome coffee, but the High Line Food vendor offers an array of house-made pastries along with its incredible single-origin drip brews and espresso. Stop by their cart at West 15th Street to enjoy treats like vanilla-saffron snickerdoodles, ginger-molasses cookies, and fennel-parmesan shortbread – a sweet-and-savory indulgence that you can also make at home using Blue Bottle's recipe. A printable version is available here.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Timothy Schenck"Head to the ground" is a compliment in gardening, indicating a serious commitment to work. Maeve demonstrates the pose in this candid shot as she tends to the 23rd Street Lawn. Photo by Timothy Schenck

This week we say farewell to Senior Gardener Maeve Turner. After nearly five years at Friends of the High Line, Maeve is leaving our organization to become the Curator of the Herb Garden at Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. She describes the new role as her "other dream job," and we're thrilled that she's moving on to such an incredible position.

But we're so sad to see her go. Maeve began working at the High Line in June of 2009, just one week after the park first opened to the public, and her footprint on our gardens is indelible. Although it would be impossible to sum up Maeve's time here in one mere blog post – not to mention her achievements – we've shared a few highlights and cherished memories below.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Liz LigonNew York City Department of Parks and Recreation Borough Commissioner Bill Castro shears a tall patch of grass to cheers from Executive Director Jenny Gersten, Borough President Gale Brewer, and volunteers. The Borough Commissioner and Borough President stopped by on Wednesday to mark the official end of this year's Spring Cutback. Photo by Liz Ligon

We've reached the official end of Spring Cutback 2014! After four weeks of hard work by staff and volunteers, this massive horticultural endeavor is complete.

We were concerned about the lasting effects of this frigid and tenacious winter on the High Line's landscape. However, there is at least one advantage of a tardy spring. "Delays in spring weather mean that we can witness the bulbs break ground," said Senior Gardener Maeve Turner. Unlike previous years, when new growth would lie hidden beneath the yet-to-be-cut dried grasses and shrubs, this spring's belated blooms will emerge in our neatly trimmed beds.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Mike TschappatOn Monday, more than 20 volunteers came out to help the High Line Gardeners tackle the densely planted Chelsea Grasslands. Photo by Mike Tschappat
 

We're approaching the end of Spring Cutback, an annual endeavor to trim back more than 100,000 plants along the High Line to make room for new growth. This week staff and volunteers began to tackle several densely planted areas, including the Chelsea Grasslands, which stretch from West 17th Street through West 20th Street.

See more photos from the third week of Spring Cutback below.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
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Photo by Timothy SchenckWhether semi- or fully nude, Pan delighted visitors from all over the world during his time on the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Pan, a mischievous-looking satyr, has been charming visitors from his perch at Gansevoort Street for nearly a year. Created by artist Sean Landers, the sculpture is part of Busted, a High Line Art group exhibition.

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