Jennette Mullaney's blog

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Jennette Mullaney
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We have exciting news to share with you. After completing an extensive search, it is our great pleasure to introduce Jenny Gersten, who will be joining Friends of the High Line as its Executive Director in January. Jenny will replace Robert Hammond, who earlier this year announced his plans to step down from the Executive Director position at the end of 2013. Joshua David will remain with Friends of the High Line as its President and will be working closely with Jenny in her role as Executive Director.

We are incredibly fortunate to have found an accomplished leader in Jenny, who has a proven track record of success in program development, non-profit management, and fundraising for arts and culture organizations. As the Artistic Director of the Williamstown Theatre Festival, where she has worked since 1996, Jenny helped create and oversee the organization’s long-range strategic plan and $7 million endowment fund. She also managed a vast professional development and training program for more than 200 apprentices, interns, and professional staff. Before the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Jenny served as the Associate Producer of The Public Theater in New York City, where she produced six Shakespeare in the Park productions.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Liz LigonFreshkills Park Administrator Eloise Hirsh spoke eloquently about the former-landfill turned oasis. "Like the High Line, it is a park of the 21st century," she said of Freshkills. Photo by Liz Ligon

How do we transform a once-notorious landfill into a beautiful New York City park?

On Monday, September 23, we hosted a discussion on the metamorphosis of Staten Island's Fresh Kills Landfill – once the largest landfill in the world – into Freshkills Park, a 2,200-acre oasis. James Corner of James Corner Field Operations and Eloise Hirsh of the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation spoke about the incredible changes they've been making to this site since the landfill closed in 2001.

James Corner Field Operations, the lead on the High Line's design team, is also leading the design of Freshkills Park. Corner discussed the unique challenges he's faced on this project, as well as the park's many idiosyncrasies. "If Freshkills is to be a living, and dynamic, and changing, and growing landscape, in a sense it never has a finished state," he remarked.

As the administrator of Freshkills Park, Hirsh has also witnessed the former landfill's about-face, and spoke eloquently of the site's transformation. "It is the most elegant testimony to the strength of nature that you can possibly imagine," said Hirsh. She also underscored the park's commitment to sustainability, describing their use of animal husbandry and green building.

Watch our full-length video of the talk below. For more images of the landfill-turned-park, see our recent photo essay.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThose eyes! Gilbert & George's Waking keeps a close watch on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Waking (1984), the prismatic High Line Billboard by artists Gilbert & George, draws the eye like a magnet. However, unlike most billboards vying for your gaze on any given day in New York City, this one gazes back.

Such a captivating work of art was bound to inspire photographers, and Waking began to appear frequently in our Flickr pool. We found these shots by Steven Severinghaus particularly striking.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
A rendering of The Diller – von Furstenberg Building, the High Line's new operations center, located at the southern terminus of the park. Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle.

In recognition of the extraordinary generosity of The Diller – von Furstenberg Family Foundation, Friends of the High Line and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation are pleased to share the news that High Line Headquarters, our new maintenance and operations hub, will be named The Diller – von Furstenberg Building.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Majora Carter and Enrique PeñalosaMajora Carter and Enrique Peñalosa joined us for a lively panel discussion on equality in public spaces. “Parks were a means to an end, an end of empowerment, of joy,” said Carter, recalling her groundbreaking work in the South Bronx. Photo by Rowa Lee

Renowned urban strategists Enrique Peñalosa and Majora Carter joined us for a July 15 panel discussion on building and sustaining equality in public open space. The dynamic speakers left the audience energized and inspired—no easy feat during the throes of a heat wave.

“A good city should feel like a park,” said Enrique Peñalosa near the end of a powerful presentation. The former Mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, spoke passionately about the benefits that access to parks and other green places bring to a city’s inhabitants.

His sentiment was echoed by Majora Carter of MCG Consulting. The MacArthur “genius” Fellow and Peabody Award–winning broadcaster gave a galvanizing presentation on urban revitalization. "You don't have to move out of your neighborhood to live in a better one,” Carter told the audience.

Watch our full-length video of the talk below. Our media partner Next City provides additional coverage in “Looking for Equality in Public Spaces.”



Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Rail YardsConstruction crews braved intense heat to make repairs to the historic High Line pipe railing. After welding is completed, the new railing segment will be painted. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Despite soaring temperatures, construction crews have been making great strides preparing the final section of the High Line, which will open in 2014.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Our friends at Google are hosting the Geek Street Fair at Hudson River Park on Wednesday, July 31. Stop by the 14th Street Park from noon to 6:00 PM for some good, geeky fun:

The Geek Street Fair hosted by Google is a public event to highlight the City’s technology community and inspire New Yorkers of all ages to take interest in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Think a traditional street fair, but replace funnel cakes and tube socks with virtual games, robotics and electronic tinkering. Manning fun booths will be the New York Hall of Science, Museum of Math, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Maya Lin Studios and other local organizations.

Open to the general public. Treats will be provided.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney


On June 24, Paul Levy of Center City District and Leah Murphy of Interface Studio and Friends of the Rail Park came to the High Line to discuss the future of Philadelphia’s Reading Viaduct. To discover what’s in store for this former city rail line, view our full-length video of the event.

For more information on the Viaduct, see “Atop Its Predecessor, Laying Out Future Options for Philly’s Reading Viaduct” by our media partner Next City.

“Beyond the High Line: Transforming Philadelphia” is part of an ongoing series of free talks to educate and inspire conversation about the transformation of the country's out-of-use industrial infrastructure into public open space. Join us on Monday, September 23, for a discussion on Staten Island’s Fresh Kills—a former landfill that is being redesigned as a public park.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Dig in: Pizza with sausage, peppers, mozzarella, and tomato at The Standard Plaza. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

Although we’re (overly?) fond of the luscious tacos and ice-cream sandwiches our food vendors offer on the High Line, we do occasionally supplement our diets with delectable food prepared by our neighbors. When our friends at The Standard Plaza tempted us with words like “pizza” and “tequila,” we knew we had to schedule a lunch at the open-air restaurant at West 13th and Washington Streets. To keep the memories as fresh as the creamy burrata, we filmed the whole thing.

The next time you’re in the mood for rosé sangria and gourmet pizza, stop by The Standard Plaza, at The Standard, High Line, at 848 Washington Street. Keep reading for a mouthwatering account of our visit.

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”It’s 6 o’clock somewhere!” The Dolores has spiced tequila and sumac salt for kick. Pimm’s, grapefruit, cucumber and mint mingle beautifully in the Copa Inglesa.
















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Rich, buttery burrata tops warm bread—the table let out an “Ooooh” when this bad boy arrived. The roasted cauliflower and asparagus appetizers behind the burrata were less sinful but just as flavorful.
















Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
EnlargePhoto by Charlie Maffei

From tasteful nudes to tasty (risotto) balls, there are many different ways to celebrate Pride Week on the High Line.

Due to large crowds anticipated in Chelsea for NYC Pride festivities, the New York City Police Department and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation ask us to close early the day of the parade—at 6:00 PM on Sunday, June 30. Until then, however, we invite you to try out special Pride Week dishes at our food vendors. And if you don’t feel like spending any cash, it’s always free to sit on the steps at 10th Avenue Square and watch the fabulously diverse crowd strut their stuff.

Rainbow Salad with Sausage & Balls at Terroir

In celebration of Pride Week, our open-air café at West 15th Street will be serving a “Loud and Proud Rainbow Salad.” Available through June 30, the colorful salad consists of mixed baby lettuce, radish, carrot, golden beets, snap peas, red onion, and lemon vinaigrette. Terroir is also getting a little saucier with a “Sausage and Balls” special for the weekend, so be sure to leave room for this dish of house-made sage leaf lamb sausage with beet and Gorgonzola risotto balls.

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