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Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Spring really is here: the 23rd Street Lawn is open. Photo by Navid Baraty.

Get ready for some serious people-watching. The 23rd Street Lawn has officially re-opened for the busy season ahead. Pack a picnic, slide on your darkest shades (better for people-watching), and head out to the High Line to enjoy the park’s one and only lawn.

Like last year, the 23rd Street Lawn will be open Wednesdays through Sundays. The grass needs to recover after entertaining guests all weekend—an average of eighty-thousand during the summer months—which makes it necessary for us to close the Lawn on Mondays and Tuesdays*. This is just one of the many challenges of maintaining such a popular green space. “It’s really hard to keep it looking good and green with so much traffic throughout the summer,” says High Line Gardener Maeve Turner. Using organic products, she’s developed a program that’s kept the Lawn healthy since its grand opening in 2011.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Goshka Macuga, Colin Powell, 2009. Part of Busted, a HIGH LINE COMMISSION. On view April 2013 – April 2014 on the High Line, New York. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

We’re excited to bring you a fantastic spring season of art on the High Line, with new commissions, installations, and video screenings by acclaimed artists. Our overview of what’s on view takes you northward, from Gansevoort Street to the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
West 16th Street, 1950s. Photo by Ed DoyleTaken in the 1950s, this photograph shows a passenger car at West 16th Street. Around the same time this image was captured, construction was underway on the interstate highway system, which would lead to further decline in freight traffic to and from New York City. Photo by Ed Doyle
 

This special blog post, the second in a two-part series (see part one), was written by Sonya Kharas of the NYU Food Studies Program and Nutshell Projects.

Feeding the Future

A slow, inefficient, and costly transportation system was incongruous with New York City in the 1920s. After all, this was the city that completed two of the world’s tallest skyscrapers — the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings — within the same year, and the city about which F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, “Everything is possible. I am in the land of ambition, and success.”

And so, in 1929, the City of New York and the New York Central Railroad Company embarked on an ambitious project that would elevate the grade-level tracks along Manhattan’s West Side and, more importantly, modernize the handling of the city’s daily supplies of foodstuffs.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
As the city's population grew, congestion caused by a mix of pedestrians, motorized traffic, and street-level freight trains slowed food delivery into New York City. Photo courtesy of the Kalmbach Publishing Company
 

This special blog post, the first in a two-part series (see part two), was written by Sonya Kharas of the NYU Food Studies Program and Nutshell Projects.

Last fall, Friends of the High Line announced plans to open a year-round, full-service restaurant directly below the elevated railway’s southern terminus, at Gansevoort and Washington Streets. The restaurant, to be operated by the team behind Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm, will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, and, as it turns out, provide a perfect starting point to consider the historic role that the High Line has played in feeding New York City.

A Historic Marketplace

Decades ago, the site of the High Line’s forthcoming restaurant was home to one of the city’s most important municipal markets: the open-air Farmers’ Market, later Gansevoort Market, for regional produce. Established in 1879, the market was devoted almost entirely to the sale of fruits and vegetables, the majority of which arrived by horse-drawn wagon from nearby farms in Long Island, Staten Island, New Jersey, and Westchester.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Staff Members Wearing DVF High Line Items(Left) Wrapped in DVF’s High Line Scarf, High Line Community Engagement Manager Erycka Montoya Pérez takes in the cityscape. (Right) Executive Projects Manager AV Goodsell uses DVF’s High Line Tote to carry her items around NYC. Photos by Liz Ligon

This Mother’s Day, give mom something she’ll love and support the High Line with the Diane von Furstenberg limited-edition High Line collection. Designed exclusively for Friends of the High Line, these sleek accessories and supplies are available only on the High Line and at our web shop. With prices ranging from $10 to $85, you can swathe your mom in DVF without breaking the bank.

Decorated with a bright-green heart motif, our DVF High Line Tote is chic and roomy—perfect for a trip to the farmer’s market. And because it’s made of high-quality coated canvas, this carry-all will continue to look new long after May 12. Present it to mom with some goodies inside, like our cute DVF notebooks and magnets.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
#GetBusted ContestYou can nominate and vote for a person who you would like to see commemorated in a sculpture on the High Line.

How would you like to see a sculpture of your favorite person grace the High Line?

For thousands of years, people have been erecting monuments of public figures in parks. Isn’t it time that you had a say in who was up there?

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s group exhibition of ten sculptures, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
SoulCycle on the High LineMaster instructor Laurie Cole gets cyclists’ heart pumping beneath the blue lighting of the Chelsea Market Passage at West 16th Street. Photo by Liz Ligon

One hundred cyclists took part in a “cardio party” on the High Line last Thursday night, enjoying special a SoulCycle ride to benefit Friends of the High Line. In addition to gleaming rows of custom stationary bikes, SoulCycle set the mood for an inspirational workout with music by DJ Journey.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
High Line Merchandise CartThe High Line’s commitment to innovative design and sustainability is reflected in each of our items. Photo by Sari Goodfriend

Now you can get those cool magnets you’ve been eyeing without having to spring for shipping. Boasting an array of new items, the High Line Shop Carts will reopen Tuesday, April 16th, at West 16th Street. We’ve extended our hours, so you can browse our postcards, tee-shirts, and other distinctive merchandise six days a week—Tuesday through Sunday, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

EnlargePaula Scher High Line Map PosterPaula Scher High Line Map Poster

Your purchase directly supports the maintenance and operation of the High Line, so each time you carry your DVF High Line Logo Tote or wear your Logo Tee, you’ll look awesome and altruistic. Adore the Paula Scher High Line Map Poster but lack the extra room in your suitcase to carry it home? Never fear—we are now able to ship your cart purchase to any domestic or international address.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photos by Nicole Franzen, Jason Scott courtesy of The Taco Truck, and Patricia Wancko courtesy of Sigmund’s Pretzels

If you, like us, salivate over the glossy deliciousness found in the food section of New York magazine, then you saw this week’s exciting announcement about spring eats at the High Line.

Lamb ribs, brisket sandwiches, and a delectable selection of pies are coming to the park this season—and that’s just at the SmokeLine, the latest outpost of BrisketTown’s Daniel Delaney. Beginning Friday, April 19, there will be nine food vendors on the High Line, offering tasty treats for your next al fresco breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Follow us after the jump for a quick, hunger-panic-inducing introduction to this season of High Line Food.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Cats enjoy the sunshine, fresh air, and conspicuous lack of annoying dogs at our first FeLine Friends of the High Line cat festival.

Meow! The fur flew this Saturday during FeLine Friends of the High Line, the first annual cat festival on the High Line. From the Rail Yards Gate to the Gansevoort Woodland, hundreds of fuzzy felines and their human companions spent the day purring, napping, gossiping, and then napping again.

A bubble blowing machine, several dozen laser pointers, three 10-foot-long “Fun Tunnels,” and all kinds of cardboard boxes kept the frisky felines entertained from morning till dusk. Volunteer Lucy Redoglia marveled at the high turnout as she flicked a feathered cat teaser for a clowder of mesmerized calicos. “After the Walker Art Center’s Internet Cat Video Festival last August, I thought, ‘New York should be doing something like this!’” she said.

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