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Kate Lindquist
This special High Line Live! performance turned the High Line at Little West 13th Street into an open theater at sunset. Photo by Julienne Schaer
 

This week we kicked off High Line Live! – our new program series that brings live theater, performance, and music to the park, thanks to the generous support of MetLife Foundation. More than 150 people joined us on Thursday, June 7 for the Hudson Guild Theater Company debut of their new production, The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line, a contemporary dance adaptation of Tchaikovsky’s classic The Sleeping Beauty. The performance coincided with the first anniversary of the opening of Section 2, making it an extra special occasion to gather with some of our closest neighbors.

Matthew Westerby choreographed the modern dance piece, which featured dancers of all ages and experience levels – many from our own community. The performance was produced by Jim Furlong, Director of Arts at Hudson Guild, a multi-service community center serving those who live, work, or go to school in Chelsea, with a focus on those in need. The Sleeping Beauty is one of many public programs we’ve presented at the High Line in partnership with Hudson Guild.

Join us after the jump to see more photos from The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
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"Instead of a daily sales goal, I reversed the normal rules of the game and developed a daily rejection goal. If I wasn’t getting rejected, I wasn’t trying hard enough. If I got a lot of rejections, I made my goal… Sometimes rejection can be a good teacher, and sometimes you almost need to seek it out to be freed from it."

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
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Earlier this morning, a three-block portion of the High Line was temporarily closed to allow emergency responders to investigate a small construction accident at a nearby work site. The NYC Fire Department and NYC Department of Buildings have determined that the High Line sustained no damage and the elevated park itself is structurally sound. The City agencies have cleared the closed portion of the park to reopen to the public.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Construction crews are installing the steel beams and columns that will make up the building frame of the new High Line Headquarters. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Visit the southern end of the High Line, and you will see a dramatic transformation in progress next to the park. Construction is underway on the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art. Last week, the first delivery of steel I-beams and columns arrived on the job site, and crews began erecting the frame of what will be the future home of maintenance and operations for the High Line.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and a photo tour of the site.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

We are one step closer to securing the third and final section of the High Line at the rail yards to be transformed into public open space.

On Wednesday, April 25, the New York City Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve a zoning text amendment that secures the eastern portion of the High Line at the rail yards, including the 10th Avenue Spur, as public open space.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about this important step for the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

Since the very beginning, community input has played an important role in shaping the development of the High Line. This tradition continues today.

More than 400 neighbors, supporters, members, and friends attended the High Line at the Rail Yards Community Input Meeting on Monday, March 12 to see a presentation by James Corner and Ric Scofidio, of the High Line Design Team. The meeting gave our community the opportunity to be among the first to see the initial design concepts for the rail yards and to share their feedback directly with the designers.

Follow us after the jump for photos from the meeting and a summary of the public’s comments.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
A design rendering of Jeff Koons' Train at the High Line. Image by James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Jeff Koons.
 

As we continue to refine the initial design concepts for the rail yards section of the High Line, the design team is studying a range of options for the 10th Avenue Spur, with the objective to make it one of the major gathering spaces at the park.

We showed two initial design concepts for the Spur at a community input meeting on Monday, March 12, and we also wanted to share a potential art installation conceived by artist Jeff Koons that could work with either of them.

As one more far-reaching ideas – one that would bring trains back to the High Line in a big way – the art installation, called Train, would feature a full-size replica of a 1943 Baldwin 2900 steam locomotive suspended from a crane above the Spur.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line Gardeners are busily working to cut back more than 100,000 plants by hand to prepare for new spring growth on the High Line. The process, called High Line Spring Cutback, began this week.
 

This week we begin High Line Spring Cutback – our biggest horticultural task of the year.

Visit the High Line over the next six weeks, and you’ll see High Line Gardeners busily working with teams of volunteers to cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. With each cut they make, you will start to see new green shoots and early spring bulbs emerge.

This morning we invited volunteers, supporters, and local teens from the NYC Lab School for Collaborative Studies to take part in a ceremonial cutting to mark the launch. Follow us after the jump to learn more and view photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Work is progressing at the site of the future High Line Headquarters. In the foreground, the formwork for the pile caps and grade beam are outlined in plywood. Crews will pour concrete into these forms; once the concrete dries, the plywood will be removed. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Stand on the High Line near its southern end, and look to the west toward the Hudson River. You will see a giant construction site covered with steel beams, plywood, backhoes, and other heavy duty equipment. It is all part of the ongoing work to build the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The High Line, looking south from West 23rd Street. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

In case you missed it, last month Travel + Leisure named the High Line as No. 10 on its list of the world’s most popular landmarks.

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