Kate Lindquist's blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Celluloid Strip

Happy Valentine’s Day from Friends of the High Line!

In honor of the romantic holiday, here’s a celluloid strip of lipstick kisses from Jennifer West’s silent film currently looping on HIGH LINE CHANNEL.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
On the Falcone Flyover, visitors can walk through lush foliage at canopy-level during the warmer months of the year. Current mulching efforts will mean healthier and more robust plants this upcoming summer. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are always looking for unique ways to minimize waste, cultivate sustainable operations, and keep our discarded plant material closer to home. That is why we are excited about a new opportunity for closed-loop recycling with the introduction of our own organic mulch below the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and 26th Streets.

The Falcone Flyover contains an elevated walkway that carries visitors through a canopy of sumac and magnolia trees. Below the pathway, a gently rolling topography creates soil depth to accommodate shrubs and trees, but it is also prone to erosion.

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A new experiment is underway to prevent the erosion and increase the soil’s fertility. Using a test area, the High Line Gardeners recently introduced an application of organic mulch created from discarded plant material from the High Line, with the goal of increasing use of compostable material on-site and reducing the frequency of visits to off-site composting locations in the future.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle
 

High Line visitors will have a new place to share a meal next year.

Friends of the High Line is now seeking an operator to run a new full-service, year-round restaurant to open directly below the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets in October, 2013.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Joel Sternfeld’s early photographs take us back in time to the 1970s and 1980s, giving us a glimpse of the people, spaces, and style that helped define the era. Taken at a shopping mall, this photograph, titled New Jersey, (#26), May/June 1980, is part of a collection on view at Luhring Augustine, New York. Photo courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.
 

Many know Joel Sternfeld as the photographer behind the now-iconic images of the wild landscape that grew up on the High Line when the trains stopped running in the 1980s. But his portfolio spans four decades, and a broad collection of his first works is now on view at his gallery, Luhring Augustine, New York in Chelsea.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
presentationHigh Line at the Rail Yards Community Meeting in December, 2011. Photo by Yoon Kim
 
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We asked. You told us. Now the fun begins.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line GingerbreadAn edible High Line made of gingerbread, frosting, and festive winter plants is now on view at Cookshop.
 

Edible High Lines are the new trend this holiday season.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist

The holidays are upon us. If you find yourself searching for the perfect gift for your loved one, look no further than the High Line Web Shop, where you can pick up your copy of High Line: The Inside Story of New York City’s Park in the Sky.

Here are the reasons why our new book makes a great gift:

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
EnlargeHigh Line Talk

Planning to give a copy of our new book, High Line: The Inside Story of New York City’s Park in the Sky, as a holiday gift?

Join us this week to get the book signed by the authors, Joshua David and Robert Hammond. The High Line Co-Founders will be at Charles Nolan on Thursday, December 8 and the Whitney Museum of American Art on Friday, December 9.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
100000 BillPhoto by Friends of the High Line Courtesy John Baldessari and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York
 

Today we unveiled The First $100,000 I Ever Made, a new work created by artist John Baldessari. The work features a $100,000 bill enlarged to cover the 25-by-75 foot billboard next to the High Line at West 18th Street. This is the first work presented in a newly launched series called HIGH LINE BILLBOARD.

We asked Cecilia Alemani, Curator and Director of High Line Art at Friends of the High Line, to answer some questions about the new work.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


It’s a familiar experience for those who have recently visited the High Line. Standing at the northernmost point of the park, you look through the metal construction fence and see the still undeveloped stretch of the historic freight rail structure. You ask yourself, “What is happening out there? Will this be open to the public?”

Here is your chance to find out.

Join us at the High Line at the Rail Yards Community Input Meeting on Tuesday, December 6 at 6:30 PM to get an update on the third and final section of the High Line.

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