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Kate Lindquist
A nighttime view from West 23rd Street, looking north toward Hudson Yards, where Coach will be an anchor tenant in a new tower under construction at West 30th Street and 10th Avenue. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are pleased to share exciting news: Coach has made a $5 million gift to the Campaign for the High Line, a fundraising effort to open the High Line at the Rail Yards and build an endowment to sustain the park’s long-term maintenance and operations. This generous gift, made by Coach’s philanthropic foundation, marks a major step toward opening the entire elevated railway to visitors and sustaining the park for future generations to enjoy.

The company will be the anchor tenant in a Hudson Yards tower that will straddle the High Line at the Rail Yards, resulting in a new semi-enclosed passageway that will be the High Line’s largest covered area when the park opens in 2014. In recognition of Coach’s essential contribution to the High Line and the neighborhood it has served for over 70 years, this passageway will be named the “Coach Passage.”

View the press release, or read about it in The New York Times

When you read about inspiring acts of generosity like this one from Coach, it is easy to assume that your own gift may no longer be needed. But please don't forget: We still depend on all of our friends and supporters to maintain and operate the High Line.

Coach’s extraordinary gift will support the expansion of the High Line and help ensure its security for the future, but the day-to-day operations of the park continue to depend on the sustaining support of our neighbors and friends.

As part of our agreement with the City of New York, each year we raise the essential private funding to support 90% of the High Line's operating budget. Custodians, gardeners, educators, mechanics, rangers, technicians—every person you see in the park in a High Line uniform is employed by Friends of the High Line. The City of New York provides for security and utility services, while the rest of the park’s operations budget, as well as the entirety of its administrative budget, are supported by donations secured by Friends of the High Line.

That means when you give to Friends of the High Line, you are helping us make sure that this special public space is always maintained and operated at the high standards we have come to love. We thank all of our members and supporters for their vision in building the High Line, their wisdom in securing its stability for the future, and their ongoing generosity in sustaining it today.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Photo by Tom Kletecka.

Later this season, Danya Sherman, our Director of Public Programs, Education & Community Engagement, will be moving on from Friends of the High Line to pursue a graduate degree in urban planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.

Though she will stay with us through June to help transition her successor, we want to take a moment to reflect on her positive impact and share our personal experience working with her.

Follow us after the jump for photos and anecdotes from the High Line community.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
A rainy day scene from earlier this week. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

One of my favorite times to visit the park in the spring is right after a heavy rainfall. The plants glisten with dewdrops, and the pathway is clear of the usual crowds, allowing for a peaceful and serene meander through the park.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Sweet Leaf Tea on the High LineFind your #SweetActs on Friday, May 17, with Sweet Leaf® Tea at the Chelsea Market Passage.

Give someone a seat on the subway. Send a friend a handwritten note. Start an urban garden.

Stop by the High Line to plan your sweet act for the day. Take part in an interactive installation presented by Sweet Leaf® Tea, and enjoy free drinks and goodies as you take in the views from the High Line.

Follow us after the jump for details.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
View looking east, at 11th Avenue and West 30th Street. Before and after on the High Line at the Rail Yards. Along the straightaway between 10th and 11th Avenues, the self-seeded landscape is being removed to make way for the park’s new design features, but it will remain untouched on the western stretch of the site. There, crews will build a simple path, called the Interim Walkway, to let visitors experience the original wildscape. Photos by Timothy Schenck

Site preparation took a major step forward this month, when crews began removing soil, ballast, tracks, and debris from the High Line’s concrete deck.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
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We are pleased to introduce you to Jennette Mullaney – social media guru, literary buff, art enthusiast, cat lover, and the latest addition to our staff at Friends of the High Line. As the new Digital Communications Manager, Jennette is working to share the High Line story and engage the park’s fans around the world on our social media channels.

We asked Jennette to answer a few questions about herself and her plans for the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Stop by the park next week for an evening stroll, and enjoy the views from the 26th Street Viewing Spur. Photo by Iwan Baan

It’s official: the High Line’s spring hours will begin on Monday, April 1.

Beginning on Monday, the park will be open daily, from 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM. Summer hours will begin on Saturday, June 1, with the park remaining open one hour later, until 11:00 PM.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
We did it! Despite the unseasonably cold weather, two snowstorms, several days of rain, and yesterday's hail shower, we completed this year's High Line Spring Cutback in record time. These horticulture enthusiasts from REI were among the 80 volunteers who helped get the job done. Photo by Liz Ligon

We have just completed the fourth and final week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to prepare for the new growing season. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See photos from our last week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist

Earlier this week, High Line Photographer Beverly Israely captured this interesting shot of the hollow stems of the Equisetum hyemale, or giant horsetail. This wetland species grows along the water feature on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck, between West 14th and West 15th Streets.

As one of the park’s neighbors and a member of Friends of the High Line, Beverly has been working to build a portfolio of photographs that celebrate the High Line’s myriad textures and changes in the landscape's color and form over the four seasons.

With Spring Cutback nearly complete, you will find unusual textures along the High Line’s landscape. The High Line’s wild grasses, shrubs, and flowering perennials have been trimmed back to make way for the new growing season, and that means over the next couple of weeks, you’ll see the landscape transform itself, as fresh green growth pops up all along the park.

Learn more about the High Line’s planting design.

Share your photos with us in the High Line Flickr Pool, or tag @highlinnyc on Instagram or Twitter.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 
EnlargePhoto by Barry Munger

We are about to begin an exciting new chapter in the life of the High Line.

Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond today announced his intent to step down at the end of the year. Along with Co-Founder Joshua David, Robert has worked tirelessly for 14 years to build the High Line and make it into a beloved public space.

Follow us after the jump to read Robert’s letter to supporters.





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