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Plinth

Newly opened in June 2019, the Plinth is the first space on the High Line—and one of the only sites in New York City—dedicated solely to a rotating series of new, monumental, contemporary art commissions. The Plinth is located on the Spur, the newest section of the High Line at 30th Street and 10th Avenue, where a large open space offers sweeping city views. Artworks selected for the Plinth will thus become part of the cityscape itself, remaining on display for 18 months.

 

Newly opened in June 2019, the Plinth is the first space on the High Line—and one of the only sites in New York City—dedicated solely to a rotating series of new, monumental, contemporary art commissions. The Plinth is located on the Spur, the newest section of the High Line at 30th Street and 10th Avenue, where a large open space offers sweeping city views. Artworks selected for the Plinth will thus become part of the cityscape itself, remaining on display for 18 months.

 

Now on view

Simone Leigh Brick House

For the inaugural High Line Plinth, Simone Leigh presents Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a Black woman whose torso is conflated with the forms of a skirt and a clay house.

 

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About the Plinth

The High Line Plinth is a new landmark destination for public art, designed as the focal point of the Spur, the newest section of the High Line. Unlike most of the other sections of the park where visitors are moving along thoroughfares, the Spur is conceived as a natural gathering space. The Plinth serves as an anchor at the center of this piazza, creating a dialogue with the towering skyscrapers and arresting vistas of the immediate surroundings.

As the first location on the High Line that is solely dedicated to the presentation of art, the High Line Plinth provides artists an incredible opportunity to realize new and ambitious commissions on a scale rarely seen in the public sphere in New York. Inspired by the Fourth Plinth of Trafalgar Square in London, the large scale and high visibility of the Plinth offers artists a unique platform to inspire a diverse public audience and contribute to the ever-changing conversation around contemporary art and monuments.

The inaugural High Line Plinth was initiated by an international advisory committee of 13 artists, curators, and art world professionals who each submitted recommendations of artists to invite to submit a proposal for the Plinth.  Twelve proposals were then selected from the initial group of fifty. Simone Leigh’s Brick House, known as Cupboard VII in the proposal stage, was ultimately chosen as the inaugural High Line Plinth Commission. Brick House is now on view at the Spur and will remain on view through September 2020.

Proposals for the High Line Plinth

Learn more about the 12 shortlisted proposals, selected from an initial group of 50, for the inaugural High Line Plinth.

Explore

Commissions

We work with world renowned artists to commission temporary, site specific sculptures, installations and murals that are visible from the high line and the surrounding neighborhood.

Channel

Everyday at dusk at High Line on 14th street, we screen a rotating selection of video and art, including both new and historic works

Performances

Artists create participatory, dynamic performances and transformative experiences that take advantage of the High Line’s great setting.

Support

Major support of the High Line Plinth comes from a dedicated group of contemporary art leaders and philanthropists. The High Line Plinth Committee supports the realization and success of major art commissions on the Plinth. The Committee includes Shelley Fox Aarons, Fairfax Dorn, Andrew Hall, Hermine Riegerl Heller, J. Tomilson Hill, Dorothy Lichtenstein, Donald R. Mullen, Jr., Mario J. Palumbo, Jr, and Anonymous.