Park update: The Spur & Coach Passage sections of the High Line at 30th St. & 10th Ave. will be closed through December 11. The rest of the park will remain open.

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Photo by Korakrit Arunanondchai 2019; courtesy the artist; Carlos / Ishikawa, London; Clearing, New York; Bangkok CityCity Gallery, Bangkok

Korakrit Arunanondchai

Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3

November 11, 2019 – January 8, 2020
Location

On the High Line at 14th St.

Screens daily at 5pm.

Korakrit Arunanondchai (b. 1986, Bangkok, Thailand) works primarily in video, weaving together familial characters and stories alongside larger societal narratives. Using documentary and found footage as well original footage, Arunanondchai focuses on how animism—the belief that plants, animals, and inanimate objects have a soul—is found throughout our contemporary mythologies, especially in the ways we interact with technology and our global information networks. In all of his work, Arunanondchai looks at the ways that we—people, animals, plants, etc.—speak to each other across time, thus breaking down the divisions between past and present.

Most recently, his ongoing video series Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names follows the character of a Thai denim painter played by the artist himself. For the High Line, Arunanondchai presents the third film in this series, completed in 2015. The series is a living archive of the artist’s thoughts and feelings around current events and people in his life, updated with a new episode approximately every two years.


Support

Lead support for High Line Art comes from Amanda and Don Mullen. Major support for High Line Art is provided by Shelley Fox Aarons and Philip E. Aarons, The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, and Charina Endowment Fund. High Line Art is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the New York City Council, under the leadership of Speaker Corey Johnson.