The High Line Blog

  • Gardening in the Sky: Spring Ephemerals

    Spring ephemerals emerge, bloom, produce seed, and disappear all within a matter of weeks. On the High Line, these plants add color and texture to our gardens early in the season, when many perennials are still dormant and have been cut back to only a few inches above the ground. Ephemerals al... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Virginia bluebells

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Blue Moon wild phlox

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Twinleaf

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, d... read more
  • High Line Gardeners & Volunteers Complete 2016 Cutback Season

    Another Spring Cutback on the High Line has been completed—and in record time. Our team of 15 gardeners completed this tremendous undertaking earlier than ever with the help of 175 volunteers who contributed more than 690 combined volunteer hours. With the unseasonable warmth of this spring, t... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Korean Tassel Fern

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability... read more
  • Q&A with Spring Cutback Volunteer Bridget Gramling

    Before the onset of spring, our High Line gardeners and volunteers begin to work vigorously on trimming back textured grasses and perennials to make way for new growth along our 1.5-mile-long park. February 29 marked the first day of this monumental task, called Spring Cutback. And with the co... read more
  • Gardening in the Sky: Cutting Back, Springing Forward

    High Line volunteers working alongside our gardeners for Spring Cutback. Photo by Julieanne Prevete. Each year, more than a hundred volunteers join our horticulture team to cut back the park's grasses and broad leaf perennials. We are nearly 75% done with Spring Cutback and have cut back m... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Snow crocus

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptab... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Toyo-Nishiki Flowering Quince

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 500 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptab... read more