Park update: Starting Saturday, February 13, the High Line will be closed south of 14th Street due to neighboring construction work. The southernmost access point is now 14th Street (elevator/stairs). Follow us on Twitter at @highlinenyc for updates.

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High Line Connections

In January 2021, Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed a plan to build extensions connecting the High Line to Moynihan Train Hall and eventually to Hudson River Park. Ever since the High Line’s inception, we’ve studied challenges to pedestrian mobility in this neighborhood and assessed opportunities for improvement. We’re excited by this plan’s potential to create safer, more enjoyable ways to move through the city.

In January 2021, Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed a plan to build extensions connecting the High Line to Moynihan Train Hall and eventually to Hudson River Park. Ever since the High Line’s inception, we’ve studied challenges to pedestrian mobility in this neighborhood and assessed opportunities for improvement. We’re excited by this plan’s potential to create safer, more enjoyable ways to move through the city.

Creating new High Line connections

Governor Cuomo’s proposed plan, in partnership with Brookfield Properties and Friends of the High Line, will increase pedestrian connectivity on the West Side of Manhattan. Coming soon after the historic opening of Moynihan Train Hall, this innovative proposal harnesses the potential of the High Line to create new ways to access Hudson River Park, the Javits Center, Hudson Yards, Manhattan West, Moynihan Train Hall, Penn Station, and surrounding neighborhoods.

In his announcement, Governor Cuomo said, “Moynihan Train Hall is the first piece of the puzzle that we’ve laid out for transforming Penn Station into the Empire Station Complex—and extending the High Line to meet this transportation hub will boost interconnectivity across the West Side, while fundamentally improving New Yorkers’ commutes. In 2020, we reintroduced light into Penn Station, and this new project will link Moynihan Train Hall to one of New York’s most prized public spaces.”

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We are eager to work with the Governor’s office and Brookfield Properties to explore this exciting opportunity. We see it as an extension of the work we’ve been championing for over 20 years. The Governor’s announcement represents a shared vision to expand the ways we connect the neighborhoods, institutions, businesses, parks, and transportation hubs that define Manhattan’s West Side.

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Rendering courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Office of Governor Cuomo

Phase 1: High Line East Connection

The proposed first phase would create an eastern extension of the existing High Line, connecting it to Penn Station. Extending from the Spur at 10th Avenue and 30th Street, the elevated pathway would continue east along 30th Street to the mid-block between 9th and 10th Avenues, turning north along Dyer Avenue to connect to the public space at Manhattan West, Brookfield Properties’ residential and commercial hub, directly across 9th Avenue from Moynihan Train Hall.

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Rendering courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Office of Governor Cuomo

Phase 2: High Line North Connection

The proposed second phase would extend the High Line westward to Hudson River Park. This connection would start at the northwestern end of the High Line, which currently terminates at 34th Street and 12th Avenue, moving northward, past the Javits Center, before turning west to cross the West Side Highway and end at Pier 76 at Hudson River Park.

A public-private partnership
The proposal will be a public-private partnership between Empire State Development, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Brookfield Properties, and the High Line. Numerous community and elected leaders and planning organizations have explored the possibility of connections between sites of importance in this area for years. The Governor’s proposal is the first time that anyone has put these ideas forward as an articulated plan.

Realizing a vision
This vision is still just a concept, and requires research on site conditions, impacts, and design considerations before a budget and timeline can be determined. There is considerable work to be done before a vision like this can be realized. Most importantly, we will engage with community members and local elected officials to ensure that any plan for improved connectivity is informed by the needs and priorities of those who call this neighborhood home.

The Port Authority and Empire State Development will work together to study engineering requirements and costs. In addition, we are eager to engage in discussions with community stakeholders and our elected partners about the best ways for the High Line to support safer, more enjoyable pedestrian movement in high-traffic areas throughout our neighboring communities.

The importance of public space and urban mobility
Open, public space and safe, innovative ways of urban mobility play an essential role in the quality of life in cities. Community stakeholders have long been concerned about street-level safety in this area, where pedestrians navigate through high-traffic intersections and vehicular infrastructure. The High Line looks forward to exploring the Governor’s proposal with community members, local stakeholders, and elected officials.

Get the latest updates
We’ll share more about this work as we dig in.

To stay in the loop, join our email list

Creating new High Line connections

Governor Cuomo’s proposed plan, in partnership with Brookfield Properties and Friends of the High Line, will increase pedestrian connectivity on the West Side of Manhattan. Coming soon after the historic opening of Moynihan Train Hall, this innovative proposal harnesses the potential of the High Line to create new ways to access Hudson River Park, the Javits Center, Hudson Yards, Manhattan West, Moynihan Train Hall, Penn Station, and surrounding neighborhoods.

In his announcement, Governor Cuomo said, “Moynihan Train Hall is the first piece of the puzzle that we’ve laid out for transforming Penn Station into the Empire Station Complex—and extending the High Line to meet this transportation hub will boost interconnectivity across the West Side, while fundamentally improving New Yorkers’ commutes. In 2020, we reintroduced light into Penn Station, and this new project will link Moynihan Train Hall to one of New York’s most prized public spaces.”

null

 

We are eager to work with the Governor’s office and Brookfield Properties to explore this exciting opportunity. We see it as an extension of the work we’ve been championing for over 20 years. The Governor’s announcement represents a shared vision to expand the ways we connect the neighborhoods, institutions, businesses, parks, and transportation hubs that define Manhattan’s West Side.

null

Rendering courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Office of Governor Cuomo

Phase 1: High Line East Connection

The proposed first phase would create an eastern extension of the existing High Line, connecting it to Penn Station. Extending from the Spur at 10th Avenue and 30th Street, the elevated pathway would continue east along 30th Street to the mid-block between 9th and 10th Avenues, turning north along Dyer Avenue to connect to the public space at Manhattan West, Brookfield Properties’ residential and commercial hub, directly across 9th Avenue from Moynihan Train Hall.

null

Rendering courtesy Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Office of Governor Cuomo

Phase 2: High Line North Connection

The proposed second phase would extend the High Line westward to Hudson River Park. This connection would start at the northwestern end of the High Line, which currently terminates at 34th Street and 12th Avenue, moving northward, past the Javits Center, before turning west to cross the West Side Highway and end at Pier 76 at Hudson River Park.

A public-private partnership
The proposal will be a public-private partnership between Empire State Development, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Brookfield Properties, and the High Line. Numerous community and elected leaders and planning organizations have explored the possibility of connections between sites of importance in this area for years. The Governor’s proposal is the first time that anyone has put these ideas forward as an articulated plan.

Realizing a vision
This vision is still just a concept, and requires research on site conditions, impacts, and design considerations before a budget and timeline can be determined. There is considerable work to be done before a vision like this can be realized. Most importantly, we will engage with community members and local elected officials to ensure that any plan for improved connectivity is informed by the needs and priorities of those who call this neighborhood home.

The Port Authority and Empire State Development will work together to study engineering requirements and costs. In addition, we are eager to engage in discussions with community stakeholders and our elected partners about the best ways for the High Line to support safer, more enjoyable pedestrian movement in high-traffic areas throughout our neighboring communities.

The importance of public space and urban mobility
Open, public space and safe, innovative ways of urban mobility play an essential role in the quality of life in cities. Community stakeholders have long been concerned about street-level safety in this area, where pedestrians navigate through high-traffic intersections and vehicular infrastructure. The High Line looks forward to exploring the Governor’s proposal with community members, local stakeholders, and elected officials.

Get the latest updates
We’ll share more about this work as we dig in.

To stay in the loop, join our email list